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Just why?   The Jovial You: Humor, Jokes and Riddles

Started 5/27/21 by WALTER784; 877 views.
Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Jun-15

Thatnis a good system. We have nothing like it here.  I just talked to a woman whose four different relatives ages 52-58 just moved to retirement homes on the same street.

  • Edited June 15, 2021 3:44 pm  by  Showtalk
WALTER784

From: WALTER784

Jun-15

Showtalk said...

I just talked to a woman whose four different relatives ages 52-58 just moved to retirement homes on the same street.

52-58 moving into retirement homes... WOW... that's quite young if you ask me.

The area I live in here in Japan has 309 houses, and approximately 120 or more of those are elderly people. And by elderly, I mean 70's ~ 90's! Some live with spouse, some, one spouse has passed away.

My wife works as a caregiver in a nearby elderly retirement home. Average age of those who live there is 88 with the eldest 103 years old. They don't move in until they're unable to care for themselves.

But 52-58 is just unbelievable... I'm 63 and well... I can't see myself going into a retirement home any time soon! Those four are all younger than me so I just have trouble pondering about that.

FWIW

 

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Jun-16

They don’t have to do maintenance or worry about anything in the complex. The one I heard about are all houses in the same section.  They care for themselves unless they get to a point where they can’t.  Then everything they need it right there for them.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784

Jun-16

Showtalk said...

They don’t have to do maintenance or worry about anything in the complex. The one I heard about are all houses in the same section.  They care for themselves unless they get to a point where they can’t.  Then everything they need it right there for them.

But at age 52-58? That was my point.

I'm 63... older than that entire age group. My dad is 91... 33~39 years older than all of them!

I worked until I turned 63... so why do people of working age go into a retirement home? It just makes no sense to me.

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Jun-16

They aren’t working.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784

Jun-16

Showtalk said...

They aren’t working.

Not working at age 52-58? Why?

My Dad is 91 and not working.

My Aunt is 84 and not working.

I'm 63 and just retired... not working.

But none of us are in retirement homes.

So why do non working people have to go into retirement homes?

What about the 20 ~ 51 age group whom aren't working? How many of them are in retirement homes?

FWIW

  • Edited June 16, 2021 12:00 pm  by  WALTER784
Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Jun-16

They retire early.  Some people do well and don’t need to work anymore or they can’t for health reasons.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784

Jun-17

Showtalk said...

They retire early.  Some people do well and don’t need to work anymore or they can’t for health reasons.

For health reason, yes I can understand.

But just because you retire early and/or are well off? Doesn't make sense to me. Why can't you just live in your own home until you're unable to?

My dad retired at 52 from his job, but he continued to work until he was 69 at his home. He wasn't really that well off... a car mechanic, but after retiring, he continued to work on cars in the garage in back of our house until 69 years of age. And even now, at 91, he continues to live at that same home I was born and raised in.

He lets others mow his lawn now, but inside the house, he vacuums, cleans and cooks by himself.

He's lived there for more than 65 years and just doesn't want to leave.

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Jun-18

You assume people love their houses.  I can tell you why people I know have moved.  To be closer to family, either children, grandchildren, siblings or parents.  To give up a big house or yard that requires upkeep or has more space than they need.  To cut costs. A larger home or yard can have costs associated with it. Retirement communities provide yardwork, sometimes even housecleaning.  Some provide meals.  All do their own maintenance.  To avoid enormous property taxes that keep rising snd pricing people out of their own homes.  Because they have made huge profits on their homes in the form of equity.  To move now while they are still young enough to enjoy it and when they can make new friends and find new activities. To pursue hobbies only available in a different area.

I know two people who moved relatively young to be closer to adult children when they had their own children.  They wanted to know their grandchildren. Another woman and her husband moved around the country each time an adult child had a baby and acted as nannies for them.  They were not elderly but one was retired.  The husband was a nurse and got a new job at each location.  They stayed until the child was able to start preschool and ended up staying in one city when the final grandchild was born. The wife is retired, the husband still,works. The wife was in law enforcement and physically and mentally could not do the job anymore. I think she retired at age 50.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784

Jun-18

Showtalk said...

You assume people love their houses.

That's because where I grew up, that was the norm.

My grandparents bought a home in 1921 and my grandmother lived in that home until she was 95 just a few months before she died. She had to be placed in a retirement home for the last 4 months of her life, but always lived in that same home.

My father bought a home in 1955 and he's still living in it at age 91.

One of my aunts (will be 85 this year), moved from her original home they bought when she married after her husband died. She's still living in that home now for over 35 years.

Another aunt (will be 80 this year), is still living alone in her home she and her husband bought about 45 years ago.

An uncle of mine (now deceased), lived in the home he purchased for as long as I can remember. He bought the home before I was born and died in that same home.

Over 60% of the people in my father's neighborhood still live there. 2% moved away, the rest all passed away in their homes which they've lived in for more than 50 or 60 years.

I initially lived in apartments here in Japan, but finally bought my own home about 34 years ago and don't plan on moving what so ever.

Over 90% of the people in my neighborhood here in Japan still live in those homes. Of the 10% who don't live there, 9% of them died while only 1% moved away elsewhere. (i.e. The father was unable to live by himself after his wife died and so their son moved him closer to where they live so he could take care of his father.)

Therefore, there is no assumption at all. It's all based on facts of my relatives, my parent's and my own neighborhood actual data. And no... I don't assume ALL people like to live in the same house either, it just seems strange to me because of my surroundings... again... no assumption. All of the reasons you provide are quite plausible and probably also accurate facts as well.

But on the retiring at age 50 and moving into a retirement home at such a young age... hmmmm... unless they were unable to care for themselves in their own home, it's just... hmmmm! It's just something I've never heard of and don't have any relatives or friends in such a situation.

FWIW

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