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This should concern us   The Newsy You: News of Today

Started May-22 by Jeri (azpaints); 2461 views.
In reply toRe: msg 46
Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Jul-27

People are dying for politics.

hmmm. It has some pretty nasty side effects. It may be that its anti-inflammatory effect has limited mitigation of an immune system over-reaction, but there are corticosteroids that appear to actually work better at controlling the cytosine storm that kills some patients with the most severe virus infection reactions.

But nothing in this class of drugs has any effect on the virus itself. Some drugs developed for AIDs seem to hold promise at slowing down the virus itself (not completely, and only limited effect), while antibiotics can tamp down secondary opportunistic bacterial infections during the course of the viral infection.

So I think hydroxychloroquine against Covid-19 is kind of like using a pipe wrench to install lug nuts on a car wheel. It's not that effective when balanced against the side effects, which are pretty significant. Lots of people don't tolerate the drug well, and if already seriously ill with the virus, those unlucky folks are likely to have reactions that push them over the edge into fatal complications.

The time to see how someone reacts to the stuff is long before becoming infected. I nearly had to call 911 once years ago when someone had a really adverse reaction to hydroxychloroquine used to treat an auto-immune disorder. Fortunately the initial dose was low, or things could have been much worse.

https://www.webmd.com/drugs/2/drug-5482/hydroxychloroquine-oral/details

Hydroxychloroquine is used to prevent or treat malaria caused by mosquito bites. The United States Center for Disease Control provides updated guidelines and travel recommendations for the prevention and treatment of malaria in different parts of the world. Discuss the most recent information with your doctor before traveling to areas where malaria occurs. ... This medication is also used to treat certain auto-immune diseases (lupus, rheumatoid arthritis). It belongs to a class of medications known as disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). It can reduce skin problems in lupus and prevent swelling/pain in arthritis.

https://www.webmd.com/drugs/2/drug-5482/hydroxychloroquine-oral/details

... Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: slow heartbeat, symptoms of heart failure (such as shortness of breath, swelling ankles/feet, unusual tiredness, unusual/sudden weight gain), mental/mood changes (such as anxiety, depression, rare thoughts of suicide, hallucinations), hearing changes (such as ringing in the ears, hearing loss), easy bruising/bleeding, signs of infection (such as sore throat that doesn't go away, fever), signs of liver disease (such as severe stomach/abdominal pain, yellowing eyes/skin, dark urine), muscle weakness, unwanted/uncontrolled movements (including tongue/face twitching), hair loss, hair/skin color changes. ...

This medication may cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Tell your doctor right away if you develop symptoms of low blood sugar, such as sudden
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Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Jul-29

It apparently works if given early to cut short both the duration and effects.  

kizmet1

From: kizmet1

Aug-2

I read that it is best when patient is given zinc.

So far I have not found any real science as to what role zinc plays, if any, in fighting off the virus.

Lots of anecdotal claims, but no verifiable statistics out there yet.

But also so far have not found any clear evidence of harm.

However - "zinc" is an element in the Periodic table. There are many compounds of zinc, and some of them should not be taken internally, while other trace nutrients have other zinc compounds.

From the context of what I've been seeing though, it almost implies that one could grind up zinc metal from, say, really cheap metal water hose fittings, or even sacrificial anodes used in swamp coolers and marine applications, and eat the powder, which probably is not a good thing, either.

After all, they also used to give people mercury and mercury compounds to treat infections. It actually worked, sort of - as long as the side effect of, oh, heavy metal poisoning was overlooked.

kizmet1

From: kizmet1

Aug-3

I think you better do more research before you get a cough and decide to suck on a piece of metal from your garage.
Try zinc/coronavirus.

Probably so. I guess even if it's just a placebo effect, it gives people hope, some straws to grasp at.

and the placebo effect is pretty powerful. People have been given syrup of ipecac while being told it helps ease nausea and they ended up with less nausea. Belief can be pretty powerful in some cases. Also I know people have been given capsules of sawdust and told it would help with (fill in the blank) and they felt better after taking it.

This effect has to be compensated for during clinical trials.

kizmet1

From: kizmet1

Aug-3

I had a neighbor I did things like that to. He was spoiled and brain damaged due to a careless foreign born mother. One day his dental novacaine started wearing off and he was having hysterics and ruining plans for his siblings. I went to the bathroom and got a magic pill for him. He took it and immediatly felt better. It was whatever vitamin I had handy.
Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Aug-3

The medication is supposed to work better when taken with zinc and not work at all when zinc isn’t present.

I've seen a red plain M&M relieve a really bad migraine, just because the person didn't know it was an M&M and it was suggested that instead it was a very powerful opioid. After swallowing the M&M, he started showing not only pain relief but even side effects like euphoria from a large dose of morphine.

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