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The school board in the county I live in have voted to start with on-line classe   The Newsy You: News of Today

Started Jul-21 by MerlinsDad; 377 views.
MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad

Jul-21

Gwinnett County is the largest school system in Georgia.  Until the vote yesterday (July 20), it seemed as if they were going to hold out and open with in person instruction.  I am quite relieved to see that the board have made the wiser choice.

Gwinnett County Public Schools announced Monday morning that it will join most other districts in metro Atlanta and hold classes this fall online-only.

Although school board member Everton Blair’s impassioned speech last week at the regular meeting caused the audience to break out in applause, the other board members appeared unfazed and determined to start the year with in-person classes. In fact, afterward board chair Louise Radloff uttered, “I could strangle him.”

On Sunday, Dr. Mary Kay Murphy, who represents District 3, issued a statement saying that she, too, believes the spike in COVID-19 cases in Gwinnett County is cause to limit instruction to online-only.

“When I saw the incredible spike Friday and heard Dr. [Kathleen] Toomey’s news conference the same day about how Gwinnett and two other counties account for 26% of cases, I knew that there wouldn’t be enough time before the start of school to see a significant enough decline to ensure that students, teachers and staff would be safe,” she said Monday morning.
https://www.ajc.com/news/atlanta-news/gwinnett-plans-to-start-school-year-with-online-only-classes-after-all/B3ARCYKPMFCKNKEAYHTWPFMDVY/

Some Gwinnett County teachers marched in protest Monday, July 20

Dozens of teachers and their supporters marched a mile to the district offices of Gwinnett County Public Schools in Suwanee on Monday carrying signs such as, “who is dying to go back to school?” and “teachers should work from home.”

They were demonstrating against last month’s decision by the board of education to offer in-person classes when the school year begins next month. By the time the morning march was underway, the district had reversed its decision and joined with most other metro Atlanta school systems in offering online-only classes.

“There is no replacement for face-to-face instruction, and that was our preferred model for starting the school year,” Superintendent J. Alvin Wilbanks said in a news release. He said the change to virtual learning was made because cases of the coronavirus continue to soar in Georgia.

The hundred or so marchers, organized by Gwinnett Educators for Equity and Justice, were joined by an estimated 200 others outside the district’s office.

Members of the Gwinnett Educators for Equity and Justice group and their supporters carry signs as they march down Old Peachtree Road NW, in Suwanee, on July 20. (ALYSSA POINTER / ALYSSA.POINTER@AJC.COM)

https://www.ajc.com/news/atlanta-news/as-teachers-rally-gwinnett-moves-to-begin-school-with-virtual-classes/MFV5D3ZBLJGWZO33INMOBU2WEY/

kizmet1

From: kizmet1

Jul-30

Seems like all schools will be starting with online classes here. Be harder on early grades.
MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad

Jul-30

According to the Salem newspaper on Tuesday, some rural school systems will be open.   Seems as if Brown is handling the situation  very well.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown announced new requirements Tuesday that must be met by counties before schools are allowed to resume face-to-face instruction or hybrid models.

The new, statewide directive applies to both public and private schools, though higher education institutions and youth correctional facilities have their own guidelines.

Additionally, Brown is releasing $28 million to public schools via the Emergency Education Relief Fund to pay for things such as mobile hot spots, technology for distance learning, online curriculum and training.

To resume in-person instruction in any form, counties must meet the following requirements three weeks in a row:

  • 10 or fewer cases per 100,000 people over seven days 

  • Test positivity of 5% or less over seven days 

That means Marion County needs to have fewer than 35 cases per week to open in-person teaching. From July 19 to 25, the county had 292 cases, according to data from the Oregon Health Authority.

Polk County needs to have fewer than nine cases per week. From July 19 to 25, the county had 43 new cases. These counties' estimates are based on population statistics from the U.S Census Bureau.

Brown said many Oregonians — including students with disabilities, students of color and students living in low-income households — have already faced disproportionate impacts since schools were closed to in-person instruction

School districts can only return to in-person instruction for all grades and all schools if both the county metrics and statewide metric are met, officials said. However, there are some exceptions.

In-person instruction can resume for K-3 students and remote and rural school districts with fewer than 100 students, officials wrote in the new state directive.

"Younger students get the virus at lower rates, get less sick and spread the virus less than older students and adults," officials wrote. "Younger students also need more in-person instruction to build literacy and math skills critical for lifelong learning.

"Schools in remote and rural communities are less likely to contribute to the community spread of COVID-19 cases that cannot be traced and contained."

To have in-person instruction for K-3 or remote and rural students, the following conditions must be met:

  • Fewer than 30 cases per 100,000 over seven days 

  • Test positivity of 5% or less over seven days 

  • COVID-19 is not actively spreading in the school community 

  • School districts are in compliance with sections 1-3 of Ready Schools, Safe Learners Guidance

For districts doing in-person instruction, officials said they still need to create plans to switch to comprehensive distance learning should they need to again.
https://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/education/2020/07/28/oregon-gov-brown-sets-new-standards-reopening-schools/5531003002/

I also looked at Oregon's coronavirus dashboard posted on the 29th.  Compared to Georgia, Oregon is doing very well, probably because you all have a  governor concerned about the welfare of the citizens and we have Kemp.

Total cases   17,721
Total deaths   311

https://govstatus.egov.com/OR-OHA-COVID-19

Testing positives:  5.6%
https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/testing/individual-states/oregon

kizmet1

From: kizmet1

Jul-30

I have always felt Oregon has done well because we are a boring place to be until the weather gets dryer and warmer. There are not a lot of places for teens up to 30 somethings to mingle and meet. Maybe that is why so many have been joining the rioters?
Did you read about the Lake Grove day care (ages 6 months to 6 yrs) that had 6 kids get the virus? After being diagnosed it ended up spreading to 26, including staff, students and parents. Lake Grove is a mostly residential area next to Portland. Children do spread the virus.
MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad

Jul-30

No.  I had not heard about it. 

I can't find anything more recent than this July 1 news item

https://www.kgw.com/article/news/health/coronavirus/covid-19-at-lake-oswego-day-care-center/283-ee91f570-534c-442d-9ddd-f1dcc8d4fe05

Surely Oregon can't be that boring.  I know about the perpetual rain from October to June.  That could indeed dampen enthusiasm.  When I lived in Salem, there was considerable discussion of SAD; I think it had just recently been identified and characterized.

kizmet1

From: kizmet1

Jul-30

That is it. Cannot tell the difference between Portland and Lake Oswego without a map. Oswego is city. Grove outside of city. Either way, the virus was passed around.
MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad

Jul-30

Is that the worst outbreak in the state?  Have no nursing homes or assisted living homes had serious outbreaks? 

kizmet1

From: kizmet1

Jul-30

No. Not the worst. Just mentioned it to show everyone that little kids can and have caught the coronavirus and passed it around to adults.
Thec worst outbreak was a nursing home in SE Portland. I think it has been closed down by now. Of course, it started before much was known about the virus and how it was spread. Glad I an too poor to be stuck in a nursing home when I grow old
kizmet1

From: kizmet1

Jul-30

I have never been a big Brown fan but she is handling this well, thanks to what must be a big group of helpers. No one really knows right from wrong at this time.
MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad

Jul-30

Thank you for the information.

I, like you, have no desire to become incapable of caring for myself and be in a nursing home.  I hope you have family to care for you if need be.

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