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Is it harmful to give up teaching cursive writing in school?   The Real You: Personality Poll

Started 10/9/20 by Showtalk; 4930 views.

well, as far as the bureaucrats missing them, I'm leaning towards they brought it upon themselves, let them actually live with the consequences of the incalculable damages they cause for a while. They made that bed, let them lie in it.

Although all those who lost their livelihoods, I hope most of them have moved permanently from the deep blue cities where they were shown loud and clear they aren't appreciated. If no one opens a new restaurant in D.C. or New York for the next 50 years, it won't bother me. It just means we'll maybe have some nice places to eat beyond just the usual national chains out here in Flyover Country

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From: Showtalk 

10/15/20

Would your area support expensive, trendy restaurants?  Those seem to be the ones hurting the most.

Probably not enough who are rich and sophisticated enough for very expensive trendy restaurants. More like midrange ones instead.

One that you can get in and out of for maybe $25 to $30 a head seems about right. Even pre-pandemic, those that were more expensive tended to not last really long because there are not that many conspicuous consumption type people out in these parts.

And most of the multi-millionaire oil type people don't spend big money to impress others. The richest people I know of, you'd stumble on one of them shopping at WalMart or Sam's or even Target, because they got rich by not spending a lot of money and saving, living frugally, until they reached the point that investment income finally exceeded any wages or salary they ever made.

And you'll see them driving a 5 year old fairly plain car or truck, none of the fancy chrome pipes or luxury options. The people you see driving the fancy cars aren't really that wealthy - they are usually very deep in debt and compensating for something.

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From: Showtalk 

10/16/20

I don’t eat out a lot because $30 a person sounds expensive to me. But I enjoy cooking and for $30 in groceries can make a $50 meal or better.  There isn’t much in a restaurant I like more than what I can prepare myself.

We just got home from getting tires patched, getting a lab appointment done, and early voting. There were probably 200 people in line at the polling place (one of about 10 in town) today, so this is the highest early voting turnout I have ever seen in more than 30 years here.

I'm not sure which party this is going to favor in Texas. In past elections over the decades I've been out here, usually a very high turnout favors Republican candidates., as does inclement weather on the traditional Tuesday in November, but - this year is like nothing else, ever.

Then it was a quick return to Sam's to pick up the patched tires, top off the gas tank, get about 3/4 of the items on the grocery list, then go across the lot to HEB and get the rest of the grocery list, and then head for home.

HEB was out of the genuine pure cane sugar root beer, but they did have plenty of pumpkin spice soda and apricot tart, evidently seasonal. They were also out of their Dr Pepper equivalent off-brand that was real sugar and not high fructose corn syrup.

The kitten appreciates the case of canned cat food, too. He has been pouncing on Furby's tail all evening, and the 10 year old tomcat tolerates the rambunctious thing, but gives kitten a good swat when kitten decides to bite instead of just pounce.

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From: Showtalk 

10/16/20

Ohh, Furby is a Cat! I thought it was a stuffed toy.

It seems markets can’t tell in advance what they are going to run out of, so they don’t adjust their ordering in time. One of our markets has an excellent bakery but they bake everything at another location during the night. So by 8 am, they have their quotas for the day.  I was at my favorite market bakery yesterday late morning and the baked bins were empty. They individually wrap everything so people aren’t touching the food.  I’ve never seen it so picked over.

Furby got his name because when he was an adolescent kitten, and we talked around him, he would meow and try to imitate the sounds we made.

Which is what the stuffed toy did. It would pick up sounds and then make noises that were sort of like pseudo-speech but it didn't truly reproduce sounds like a true recording / playback device.

Just in time manufacturing and delivery seemed, from a profit maximizing and expense minimizing technique, to be the best thing since sliced bread if one were to believe what they were teaching in places like Harvard Business School.

And so the new graduates, groomed to have a lifetime of financial security anyway thanks to the family trust funds, coming out of the Ivy League, most of whom never have had to actually do real work in their life - never turned a wrench, never wrote a line of code, never picked up a soldering iron to assemble a circuit board, never shoveled manure out of a livestock stall into a wheelbarrow to spread on the south 40 acres, then just imposed this stuff from their ivory towers, and it made them money. A lot of money.

Right up until any disruption in the supply chains made that entire tightly choreographed paradigm collapse like a house of cards in a hurricane.

The stores that have done very well, such as HEB, are those that are not huge publicly traded conglomerates that mostly focus on looking good for the shareholders. Unfettered from the Harvard Business School just in time model and vertical market chains that have been squeezed for the last millisecond of time saved and the last penny of exploitation, they were able to quickly pivot and tap alternate supplies that might not have originally been intended for the consumer market.

Such as the Great Toilet Paper Catastrophe of March 2020. Office towers closed, suddenly no demand for the 2 mile long rolls of paper in the big restrooms. Working from home, sharply rising demand for the soft fluffy stuff that normally people only wiped with on that 3 AM shuffle to and from the toilet and on weekends.

There were plenty of those 2 mile long rolls of paper with a half million single ply sheets, you know, those rolls that could be painted black and be mistaken for car tires (exaggeration for drama). They really weren't 3 feet in diameter and weigh 150 pounds and have 2 miles of paper - typically about 10 inches diameter and about 2,000 squares or so, in the locking dispensers because it's the equivalent of about 5 rolls of Charmin or so.

Now those big rolls won't fit in the average household roll holder on the wall next to the toilet. Most consumers don't know where to get the big industrial roll holders.

But those content to have *anything* to wipe with that won't clog up the sewers like, say, fabric or crumpled up printer paper or newsprint, could easily set an industrial roll loose on the top of the toilet tank and learn to tear it without the serrated edge on the industrial dispensers as they work from home or sit there stuck in quarantine while dialing the unemployment bureau number 32,768 times before they actually reach someone to file their claim.

Heck, they could even put a pencil in there and while doing their thing and endlessly re-dialing the phone away from the shrieking kids home from school in the Spring Break that never ended, they can doodle on the paper, draw effigies of some bureaucrat or politician they perceive as the cause of their problems, and then wipe their butt with it and flush it away.

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From: Showtalk 

10/17/20

Interesting seque from how your cat got his name to Harvard to toilet paper.  

I drift about as badly as Calvin and Hobbes

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From: Showtalk 

10/17/20

Who? Just kidding...

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