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Have you been vaccinated for Covid 19?   The Healthy You: Health and Fitness Polls

Started 3/6/21 by Showtalk; 4275 views.
WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Mar-31

Showtalk said...

$100 million! That’s a good way to kill off part of the economy.

That was just the 1st day, then they lost $50 Mil per day for 10 days (because only one runway cut the number of flights in half) adding an additional $500 Mil for a grand total of $600 Mil plus the cost of cutting up, moving and scrapping the plane as well as the cost to repair the runway too!

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Apr-1

Did they ever make it up?

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Apr-1

Luckily, it was a cargo flight and there were only 4 lives lost, but if it would have been a passenger flight, all people on board would have probably died.

It was determined that the amount of cargo on that type of craft was overloaded which made for an unsafe landing condition especially due to the strong winds making it difficult to keep the overweight craft upright, not to mention that it bounced several times before flipping over.

Well, China and FedEx were billed for about 90% of the loss (not sure exactly who paid what) and then the airport insurance with a little bit of Japanese government assistance was able to make up for the remaining loss.

During the period that one run way was out of order, they temporarily turned one wing of the Haneda airport (about 120 kilometers away) into an international terminal and diverted 80% of the aircraft that were to use that runway over to Haneda. 20% of those aircraft scheduled to use that runway were cancelled.

About 5 or 6 years later, they started construction of a new International Terminal at Haneda airport and added an additional runway there as well as adding a 3rd runway at Narita airport.

Narita is not a 24 hour airport. It doesn't accept flights after 10:30PM. Haneda on the other hand is a 24 hour airport so should aircraft arrive after 10:30PM at Narita, they were billed a hefty late penalty charge and allowed to land, but people deboarding the plane had to stay in the terminal all night until 6AM when the customs, quarantine and other services opened up.

Now, for any flights who arrive after 10:30PM at Narita, they're forwarded to Haneda which operates 24 hours. There is a slight penalty charge for unscheduled flights, but not as big as the late penalty charge at Narita.

FWIW

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Apr-1

And then there was this one:

Asiana admits error in fatal 2013 San Francisco crash landing

On Saturday, July 6 2013, an Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 carrying mostly Chinese passengers crashed and burst into flames as it landed short of the runway at San Francisco International Airport. Two teenage girls were killed and more than 180 people were injured.

https://www.scmp.com/news/world/article/1462297/asiana-blames-pilots-and-boeing-design-flaws-crash-killed-3-chinese

And...

China Airlines Flight 006 (callsign "Dynasty 006") was a daily non-stop flight from Taipei to Los Angeles International Airport. On 19 February 1985, the Boeing 747SP operating the flight was involved in an aircraft upset accident, following the failure of the No. 4 engine

And...

Plane crash kills 42 in north-eastern China

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-pacific-11076816

And...

Air China Boeing 777 Engine Fire Prompts Emergency Landing In Washington

https://simpleflying.com/air-china-engine-fire/

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Apr-2

Isn’t space in a Japan severely limited? Here, if they need more ground space for air travel, they just expand.

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Apr-2

I remember the San Francisco crash. It was big news for days. 

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Apr-3

Showtalk said...

Isn’t space in a Japan severely limited? Here, if they need more ground space for air travel, they just expand.

It depends on where in Japan.

In larger cities, yes, it's very limited. The only way you can expand is up or down. If they want to expand sideways, it could take 20 ~ 30 or more years. Slowly buying up smaller buildings in a very large square or rectangular shape one at a time. After the final building in that block has been bought, they can finally tear down the old 2 ~ 5 or 6 story buildings, dig deep and place numerous pylons into the ground until they hit solid rock. Then they start building the basement, first floor followed by a large 40 ~ 80 story structure.

But in rural areas, they're always converting natural woodland, vegetable farms or rice paddies into homes or buildings.

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Apr-3

You are lucky they are willing to build new homes.  Here, places that need housing the most are denying building permits.  I just saw an enormous planned apartment complex scrapped because local residents to the street where it was to be built said it would pollute and cause too much traffic. Even though their own streets were not thoroughfares for new traffic.  

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Apr-4

Showtalk said...

You are lucky they are willing to build new homes.  Here, places that need housing the most are denying building permits.  I just saw an enormous planned apartment complex scrapped because local residents to the street where it was to be built said it would pollute and cause too much traffic. Even though their own streets were not thoroughfares for new traffic.

Well, the rules and zoning laws in Japan are totally different than in the US.

In Japan, they have what's called "Kenpeiritsu" which means "Building coverage" in direct translation, but it's quite complicated.

The land I bought had a building coverage rule of 70:400. That means that I can build a structure up to 70% of my total land area and the structure cannot be taller than 4 stories (400%). But that's rural zoning rules. In downtown Tokyo and other major cities, the rules and zoning laws are entirely different and much more difficult. So if you had a two story structure, wanted to tear it down and rebuild a 3 or 4 story structure in it's place, you couldn't do it due to the new building coverage laws. And if you wanted to build a super structure (40 floors or taller), you would have to acquire a massive amount of land before such construction could start. So it could take some real estate agents up to 20, 30 or more years and billions of dollars to buy up all the smaller property in and around the area.

In the mean time, what these real estate agents do is until they acquire all the land they need, the take the land they currently own, bulldoze down all the structures and turn it into a parking lot. Some times 1, 2 or 3 or more stories high and rent out that space as parking space for the 10, 20, 30 or more years until they acquire all the land around they need to start building the super structure. And parking lot rental prices in downtown Tokyo are like $6.00 for 30 minutes.

As for pollution, there's no worry about that here in Japan as they are very efficient in recycling and maintaining a clean environment. As for traffic... in downtown... there is absolutely no way to alleviate the traffic. 17 million people work in Tokyo in the daytime and 12 million people live in Tokyo during the evening. That means that 5 million people commute in and out of Tokyo daily. Of course, 90% of them commute via trains, but the remaining 10% use cars, taxis, buses, motor bikes, etc. And then you have the regular parcel delivery services, pizza, McDonald's, Uber eats and other food delivery services, Japan postal service, electric/water/gas service vehicles, etc. always on the streets somewhere in downtown Tokyo.

And then, the political problems inherent in the US are also not found here in Japan either. Things like low income housing projects in the US. Japan does have low income housing apartments and mansions, but they're not filled with minority races. They're filled with Japanese who qualify for low-income housing. Those apartments are usually located in the outskirts of Tokyo because it's cheaper than right in downtown Tokyo, but they're also not riddled with the high crime rate often found in the US either. The qualifications are strict and there's no guarantee that you can continue living there for ever either.

Politicians in the US want to clean up some of these low income project housing complexes by moving the people outside of the city, building up a new supermarket, mall or other public facility in an effort to clean up the streets, but all they're really doing is moving the poverty/high crime areas elsewhere on the outskirts of the city... nothing to actually help resolve the low income problem or the crime rate! And for this, many people in the US reject when politicians want to come in and build something because they're the ones who usually get the brunt end of the stick too. You don't have that here in Japan.

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Apr-4

Those parking rates are similar to the cost in Manhattan.  That is why so many people in big cities don’t own or use cars if they can avoid it.  San Francisco is the same.  With Covid isolation,  a car has become a prized possession.  

I don’t know much about commercial building but here everything seems to be rushed. I can’t imagine a company sitting on a huge parcel of land for 10-20-30 years when they can build right away.  We had a commercial building that was sold, and within a year, the new owners had already started construction on a satellite building for their main offices down the street. Huge companies often have other locations when their central area is tapped out and there is no more land available.

Politicians need a poor class to vote for them so there is no incentive to completely get rid of poverty. We keep waiting for that to happen and it never does.  People need to be educated, and to have work available.  It’s very simple, the politicians know it and still they can’t seem to solve it.

Yes, I heard from people traveling to Japan, you have white collar type crimes but very little physical crime.

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