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Do you believe in holding back math students for math equity?   The Serious You: How Current Events Affect You

Started 5/20/21 by Showtalk; 2735 views.
Showtalk said:

It will be interesting to see if they replace people who refuse to show up in person or who can’t because they moved two states away. Competitive jobs like tech should not have too much trouble replacing people except each hubs are very expensive to live in. That is why those jobs usually pay very well, too.

I have heard that certain industries can't fill a lot of positions. Thing is, tech workers are more likely to be able to work remotely. Same with customer service, and even sales, tech support, etc.

the very expensive part of things - a lot of tech firms have figured that if they have most of their staff remote, they don't need to renew the lease on that ultra high priced office suite in the expensive, and they avoid all sorts of expenses related to travel and such, and the workers are more productive because they can take care of things like oh, child care without needing to spend half their income on scarce or still non existent day care during the summer when school is out.

It's accelerated a trend that was already gathering momentum.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Jun-25

$1,661.87 in cats (ROCKETMAN_S) said...

a lot of tech firms have figured that if they have most of their staff remote, they don't need to renew the lease on that ultra high priced office suite in the expensive, and they avoid all sorts of expenses related to travel and such, and the workers are more productive

Yep... pre-COVID lockdown... many companies offered remote VPN access but only for some of their workers, mainly executives and road warrior salesmen who are out and around all day every day.

Then COVID lockdowns came... everybody had to work remotely, but most companies didn't have enough VPN licenses for ALL of their employees, so for the first few weeks, employees were asked to only logon for a minimal amount of time to pick up and send E-mails and then log back off so others could login. After a few weeks, they increased their VPN licenses but everybody was complaining about the sluggish speeds with everybody logged on. So another week or two went by as they increased the bandwidth speed of their corporate VPN so that everybody could get better speed. Some moved their Email servers and VPN servers into the cloud for better performance.

Finally, after 4 ~ 5 weeks, most people had fairly good access speed. But during that first month to month and a half, companies realized that they didn't have to pay for commuter tickets to come into the office by train. They also realized that the 6 floors they were renting out at the headquarters could be cut back to 3 floors if enough people started working from home. A big savings for the company.

Employees realized that they didn't have to spend the 1.5 to 2 hour commute into the office one way and had 3 ~ 4 more hours on their hands to do things for themselves or their family.

It ended up becoming a win-win for companies which could allow people to work remotely from home. But that didn't work in sectors where people had to go out and continue to work daily at construction sites, or other sites, etc.

Thus with the rollback of the lockdowns now, many companies don't want to increase their floor space for everybody to come back into the office. Some companies in fact, moved their finance department, personnel department and various other departments out of the main HQ office and into lesser expensive places further away from the big expensive cities.

So post COVID, I see a continuing trend of this in sectors which can allow their workers to work remotely. But sadly, everybody can't do that.

Another sad thing is that pre-COVID lockdowns, restaurants and drinking establishments around where the corporate headquarters are located saw a drastic drop in their customers due to this shift and lockdowns. Some have gone out of business while yet others are struggling to get back to full capacity... which doesn't look like it will ever be as full as pre-COVID!

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Jun-25

Will prices go down as a result of cost savings in the workplace? That works if they are leasing, not so much if they own their own buildings. 

Alfi (THIALFI)

From: Alfi (THIALFI) 

Jun-26

>>> So a lot of companies that refuse to continue remote workers are going to find problems filling positions (except for the lower quality workers that are more desperate) and their market share will be taken up by the competitors who aren't burdened by those expensive office spaces in the middle of overpriced cities. <<<

Indeed.

>>> It will be interesting to see how it shakes out. Of course some jobs you have to be there. Like when optical fiber has to be spliced, when power lines need maintenance, and all sorts of similar things. <<<

Those are craft jobs, which have never been office jobs.

How's the traffic there, Tex?

WALTER784 said:

It ended up becoming a win-win for companies which could allow people to work remotely from home. But that didn't work in sectors where people had to go out and continue to work daily at construction sites, or other sites, etc.

>

Yep. While salt mines are mostly done by machinery, someone has to tend the machinery. And same for logging, for repairing fiber and installing stuff.

WALTER784 said: Thus with the rollback of the lockdowns now, many companies don't want to increase their floor space for everybody to come back into the office. Some companies in fact, moved their finance department, personnel department and various other departments out of the main HQ office and into lesser expensive places further away from the big expensive cities.

Some small exurb towns have really benefitted, although this might lead to the kind of gentrification that forces retirees out.

WALTER784 said: So post COVID, I see a continuing trend of this in sectors which can allow their workers to work remotely. But sadly, everybody can't do that. Another sad thing is that pre-COVID lockdowns, restaurants and drinking establishments around where the corporate headquarters are located saw a drastic drop in their customers due to this shift and lockdowns. Some have gone out of business while yet others are struggling to get back to full capacity... which doesn't look like it will ever be as full as pre-COVID!

Yep. There are whole sectors of that ecosystem that are gone forever, much like what happens on a coral reef when the primary sources of food shift to a different area from shifting currents.

But like the story in the book "Who Moved My Cheese?" some of the people who worked for those outfits might end up working out in a suburb or exurb or rural area, maybe trimming lawns or running a smaller town restaurant or two.

Depends on the kind of industry.

Where I am at now, they just had a big R&D and physical plant meeting over a new expansion, and they decided to build the new auxiliary building twice the size as the original drawings.  So sales and likely future production is going up.

Alfi (THIALFI) said:

How's the traffic there, Tex?

It is awful. Back to pre-pandemic levels at certain times of day.

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Jun-27

Disneyland is giving $1,000 signing bonuses because they can’t hire enough employees.

Showtalk said:

Disneyland is giving $1,000 signing bonuses because they can’t hire enough employees.

<holding thumb and forefinger against each other> World's smallest violin playing "my heart bleeds for them" - lol.

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Jun-27

People love the Disney parks but they can’t open without employees.

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