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Will/did you shop at Amazon Prime Day 2021?   The Consumer You: Marketplace

Started Jun-21 by Showtalk; 1014 views.
Showtalk

Poll Question From Showtalk

Jun-21

Will/did you shop at Amazon Prime Day 2021?
  • Yes, I've already shopped2  votes
    25%
  • Not yet, but I have already looked it0  votes
    0%
  • I will0  votes
    0%
  • No, I buy from Amazon but I won't shop on Prime Day this year3  votes
    37%
  • I never shop on Amazon1  vote
    12%
  • Other2  votes
    25%
Yes, I've already shopped 
Not yet, but I have already looked it 
I will 
No, I buy from Amazon but I won't shop on Prime Day this year 
I never shop on Amazon 
Other 

Other - I didn't even know what day it was.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Jul-2

I voted other.

I used to have an Amazon account, but canceled it after they falsely accused me of signing up for their Amazon Prime.

I E-mailed them about it and profusely said that I know for a matter of fact that I unchecked that box on every order I previously made.

After that, I started getting all kinds of SPAM from "look alike" Amazon sites, but they were all phished sites which probably had some kind of malware on them.

I called my credit card company and told them to stop all payments to Amazon, but they said that they couldn't and gave me a phone number I could call to speak with an Amazon agent about the matter. The phone number they provided me with was no longer in use. I called the credit card company back and asked them to call the number they gave me and sure enough... they too discovered it was no longer in use.

I asked them again to stop payments but again they said they couldn't. So I logged into my Amazon account, went into chat mode and requested that somebody call me about the ordeal.

About 15 minutes later, this person calls me and I explain the situation, they too said that I had forgotten to uncheck the box requesting Amazon Prime. I then confirmed with them whether or not they were recording this conversation. They said they were. I then proceeded to threaten that I would take them to court if they didn't stop charging me for Amazon Prime because I DID NOT... I repeated... I DID NOT forget to uncheck the box. I asked them if they recorded that and they confirmed that they had. I further went on to tell them that they would have to refund me for the 2 months of Prime that they already charged me and they said that they would.

I removed all of my credit card information from my Account with them and when they refunded me my two months worth of Prime which I didn't order... I canceled my account with them and haven't used them since.

That was almost a year ago and I still continue to get more and more spoofed SPAM from those claiming to be Amazon.

I'll never ever do business with them again!

FWIW

  • Edited July 2, 2021 3:08 am  by  WALTER784
Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Jul-2

You already missed it.  July 21.

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Jul-2

It sounds like your account was hacked.  They are usually very responsive to requests and complaints.  

WALTER784 said:

I called my credit card company and told them to stop all payments to Amazon, but they said that they couldn't and gave me a phone number I could call to speak with an Amazon agent about the matter. The phone number they provided me with was no longer in use. I called the credit card company back and asked them to call the number they gave me and sure enough... they too discovered it was no longer in use.

A trick that works, although it's technically possible to construe as perjury in some cases - is you call the credit card company and say your card was stolen.

The card number is cancelled immediately and a new card is issued. Any new charges anyone tries to make are automatically declined.

Then tell Amazon to go pound sand when it the next round of charges are declined.

They will screech. They will maybe threaten. They might turn it to collections. They might report it on your Experian and other credit reports. If they are stupid enough to sue, you then file a countersuit and demand both compensatory and punitive damages, and move the case be tried in your home town.

The odds if it goes that far, is you win a default judgment because they have to spend a fortune to fly someone out to try the case. You can make them waste a lot of time and money.

Kim Komando called the default checking of "join Prime" a "dark pattern" - and some states and a few countries are making the practice illegal. So soon, hopefully, if they do something like that, you draft a cease and desist letter / demand letter, sent by certified mail, return receipt requested, and then wait the statutory amount of time, and then sue them in small claims court.

Here in west Texas it costs about $60 filing fees, and whatever "long arm service" costs to formally serve the papers.

It's amazing how a legal process serving can penetrate their disconnected phone numbers and voice menus from hell, with the effectiveness of a "bunker buster bomb" going through 40 feet of solid concrete in Iraq to detonate inside. Like, "Can you hear me NOW?" <kaboom>

Now admittedly, it's a bit more expensive than the amount in dispute. But when dealing with a huge faceless outfit whose business model is bilking people like that, it's often worth the expense because the intent is to *hurt them* in the wallet.

But you have to become really determined to make them your job for a few months - obsessed with finding the weaknesses in their fortress, and then like a skilled sapper, dig under the foundation and place the breaching demolition charges, and amass an army to pour through as soon as the wall is breached to swarm inside and loot and pillage and burn and make off with the spoils of war.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Jul-2

Showtalk said...

It sounds like your account was hacked.  They are usually very responsive to requests and complaints.

If my account was hacked, they would have probably ordered something or put something in my basket to buy, but nothing out of the ordinary. Likewise, my credit card info was registered in my account, but nothing happened with my credit card either. So you're saying that somebody hacked it just to turn the Amazon Prime on is not very credible.

Or perhaps Amazon purposefully turned it on unknowing to me and would refund those who catch it. Now that sounds much more plausible if you ask me.

Regardless, I don't use Amazon anymore!

FWIW

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Jul-2

$1,661.87 in cats (ROCKETMAN_S) said...

A trick that works, although it's technically possible to construe as perjury in some cases - is you call the credit card company and say your card was stolen.

The card number is cancelled immediately and a new card is issued. Any new charges anyone tries to make are automatically declined.

I did that once quite a few years ago after my wallet was stolen. But it's a PITA to change the card number for all the places which are automatically billed to my card.

FWIW

WALTER784 said:

Or perhaps Amazon purposefully turned it on unknowing to me and would refund those who catch it. Now that sounds much more plausible if you ask me.

Google the phrase "dark patterns". It's a lucrative business model. And it should be placed under RICO statutes - Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations.

WALTER784 said:

But it's a PITA to change the card number for all the places which are automatically billed to my card

About 25 to 30 years ago, a friend of mine finally had to completely close all his personal and business accounts at a bank, and move them all to a different bank, to finally get rid of CompuServe. The bank refused to shut off an auto-draft. He threatened that he would pull his business out of their bank if they refused, because CompuServe only lied and kept drafting every month anyway.

They thought he was bluffing. Not only did he close al the accounts - and his company probably had about a couple million in sales that year - but he made a formal complaint to the banking regulatory board. It cost the bank a small fortune over about $30 a month.

But the story wasn't over yet CompuServe tried to draft the closed account the next month. The bank re-opened the account and let the charges go through, then imposed overdraft fees.

Ultimately the threats escalated, and it ended up with copies of statements and stuff being sent to the Texas Attorney General's office, and even to the FBI to try and prod some criminal investigations of CompuServe, namely wire fraud. The Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act was another law cited, and he pretty much told them that he was making CompuServe his full time job until either he owned them or their whole board of directors was in prison.

At some point, they figured out that he wasn't going to go away, and also realized that it was no longer about $30 a month - it was the principle of the thing, and his goal was to cost them so much bad PR that it would amount to hundreds of thousands more than the mere $30 a month. They had poked a hippopotamus with a stick - had awakened a sleeping giant and filled him with a terrible resolve.

Suddenly, they contacted the bank and actually not only refunded all the auto-drafts but paid overdraft fees and removed the derogatory stuff from his credit report.

I don't know if it was what he had been doing, or if it was the result of a building tsunami of consumer anger and complaints filed from all corners of the US, but the squeakiest wheel eventually gets the grease.

Amazon is a lot bigger than CompuServe ever was though. It makes them a bigger target to aim for.

Meanwhile, get Josh Hawley's book "The Tyranny of Big Tech.

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