Opinion Polls: Delphi's Polling Place

Hosted by Showtalk

Opinion polls on all subjects. Opinions? Heck yes, we have opinions - but we're *always* nice about it, even when ours are diametrically opposed to yours. Register your vote today!

  • 4378
    MEMBERS
  • 91223
    MESSAGES
  • 15
    POSTS TODAY

Discussions

Should our desert communities make water from air?   The Consumer You: Marketplace

Started Jun-30 by Showtalk; 9110 views.
Showtalk said:

I don’t think masks actually stop the virus, I think they remind people to distance. People in masks who are face to face are not distancing.

There's definitely a behavioral reinforcement mechanism going on by wearing masks. I notice that wearing a mask keeps all sorts of people and their cooties away from me.

While they don't truly stop naked viruses, the particles in which they ride are going to be wet, and they are much larger than the viruses, larger than the fiber spacing on a good non-woven mask or a microfiber cloth insert.

The droplets are grabbed by capillary action when they touch a properly designed mask, which also catches the viruses within.

Evidently a dry virus begins to deteriorate surprisingly fast even though it may remain suspended for hours due to Brownian molecular motion, since at such a tiny scale these forces are much more prominent than the effects of gravity.

But the real effect of masks is they stop outgoing particles quite nicely. Not all of them. It is like radio signal strength or audio levels - you measure the attenuation in decibels, which is a logarithmic scale.

So 3 decibels are a 50% reduction, and 6 decibels are a 75% reduction, and 10 decibels are a 90% reduction.

So if there's a 10 dB particle attenuation with the mask, that has gotten rid of 90% of the particles.

20 dB is 99% reduction. 30 dB is only 1 in 1,000. 40 dB lets through 1 in 10,000.

generally, somewhere between 30 and 40 dB is close to the practical limit of any affordable filtering / mask technique until you get to some truly exotic systems that really have finer sieve channels than the virus particles, which involves the kind of manufacturing techniques you see in the semiconductor industry.

Speaking of sieves, I got to see a molecular sieve at an industrial show a few years back that is used to separate oxygen and nitrogen from the air. It also isn't 100% effective, but you get something like 98% nitrogen and argon instead of 78% with 21% oxygen from unprocessed air

For most industrial processes, 98% nitrogen and less than 2% oxygen is sufficient to prevent unwanted oxidation in the process, although not as inert of an atmosphere as, say, a pure helium purged environment. So you can handle a lot of things that would otherwise have serious corrosion problems.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Aug-13

Well, if you wear masks... it keeps the mask gestapo out of your face!

Besides that... they aren't really that effective.

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Aug-13

The masks we are wearing don’t stop covid.  There is no full consensus on that.

Finally got a bright yellow one with a coiled rattlesnake on it. Says "Don't Cough On Me"

If you add microfiber cloth, it slows it way down.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Aug-13

$1,661.87 in cats (ROCKETMAN_S) said...

Finally got a bright yellow one with a coiled rattlesnake on it. Says "Don't Cough On Me"

LOL... Like "Don't Tread on Me"...

Reminds me of a joke I heard last year.

Pre COVID, I coughed to hide a fart...

Post COVID, I fart to hide a cough!!! ;-)

FWIW

And now I wonder if they fart to hide a cough and it turns out to be a shart.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Aug-15

$1,661.87 in cats (ROCKETMAN_S) said...

they fart to hide a cough and it turns out to be a shart.

I presume the shart is a nuclear fart... you know... one with fallout? (* TEE HEE *)

FWIW

TOP