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Science Killed Itself Over COVID-19   The Serious You: How Current Events Affect You

Started 9/15/21 by WALTER784; 10141 views.

fine porous rock like a natural HEPA filter is kind of hard to find around here. It would have to probably be shipped thousands of miles from where quarried to build a useful filter.

However, we have an abundance of sand. The space between sand grains while small, isn't small enough for things like smoke sized particles.

The electrostatic separation was inspired by devices on the ceiling of a night club, over the bar and surrounding the dance floor. They had the trade name SmokEeter, and the electrostatic charge sucked smoke in one end, actually provided some air flow from the ion movement, and blew much cleaner air out the other end.

At closing time, they would shut down the units right over the bar first, discharge the high voltage, and then the positive collector / anode plates could be easily unseated once the cover was removed. They'd just put the anodes in the dishwasher to clean away all the tobacco smoke residue and related gunk, then put the clean ones in.

the other units would continue to operate to keep removing smoke from the air - now that all the drunk cowboys and cowgirls were no longer smoking like chimneys, there was no more input of fresh smoke, so the air kept clearing while the first group of units were cleaned.

Once other bar cleanup was taken care of, at some point they'd shut down some more units, remove the plates, clean and re-install.

And finally once the interior air was somewhat cleared out, they'd shut down the remainder and clean them.

Last step, they'd start them all back up for about the last 30 minutes as all the final bookkeeping and related things were done, and then shut off around dawn as they went home and locked up to be ready for yet another night.

Without them, the smoke would be so thick you could cut it with a butcher knife, your eyes would be watering, and visibility would be well below IFR Category 1 landing conditions.

It probably saved a lot of people from second hand smoke induced cancers compared to the poor ventilation of such places in the 1920s to the 1960s.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784

11/29/21

Japan has numerous volcanos all over the country. Many of them dormant, but much of the understructure has natural pockets of pumice. These pockets are mined and cut to make square or round brick/block like filters. It's quite light in weight and is porous. 

Pumice - Wikipedia

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Dec-2

I don’t think of Japan as volcano country. It’s almost never discussed in our media.

Pumice in the US is apparently not found in contiguous pieces big enough to cut into useful shapes like filters.

I have seen it mostly sold here as toilet scrubbing sticks to remove lime scale, and similar applications.

But the bubble size in the pumice I have seen are way too coarse to be useful for filtering.

Now activated charcoal, on the other hand, may have a surface area of several acres in a couple of tablespoons of material. So it is great for absorbing all sorts of sub-microscopic material and is used in a variety of industrial processes, such as to yank heavy metals from water

This, however, isn't really a filter per se - it exploits the electrostatic attraction forces at very small scales to grab stuff out of the water (or air) and hang on to it.

A synthetic material is often used in water filtration systems - it's activated charcoal manufactured in a block that requires the fluid to be filtered to pass through its microscopic pores.

This does make an effective filter, but you need a series of progressively finer and finer pre-filters upstream to get rid of fine sand, silt, and finally bacteria, and often unwanted chemicals that can bind to the carbon matrix and let the pure water go on to the reverse osmosis membrane which finally only passes water molecules and excludes salt and other dissolved minerals.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784

Dec-5

What about shale like that found all over Florida if you dig deep enough?

FWIW

Shale is kind of closed cell porosity until you break it up to release the trapped material. That's how they are getting oil out of it in the Bakken and a few other places. Drill horizontally into the seam, then apply ungodly amounts of hydraulic pressure to frack it and inject sand to act as proppant and hold open the cracks once the fluid pressure is relieved.

Probably not enough porosity to pass a reasonable amount of air through at any reasonable sized filter area. You'd probably need to make a couple of entire walls out of the stuff to get enough area to force enough air through at reasonable pressure to adequately ventilate a shelter.

Like a filter 8 feet high and 16 feet wide, maybe a half inch to a quarter inch thick, and maybe 3 or 4 PSI differential to force the air through, which means a lot of mechanical support, like a bazillion smaller panes supported by, say, steel beams, so the pressure doesn't just make it implode.

now I've got to do some more research on shale porosity when it's quarried unaltered from the ground.

I know that it metamorphoses under heat and pressure into slate, which is quite non-porous. They used it for some castle roofs all over Europe for many thousands of years. And it is used as pool table sub-surfaces, beneath the felt, because it's heavy and flakes off nice and smooth.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784

Dec-6

The outer walls and roof of my home are made of slate. The slate walls are about 1.5" in thickness and work great to keep the heat out or heat in. 

In the summer months, the outer walls are hot but the inner walls are still cool. Likewise, when we heat the inner house, the heat doesn't dissipate to the outer surface of the slate.

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Dec-6

I have a small water filter and it uses carbon. But it also leaves small particles in the water right after it’s changed out for a new one.

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Dec-6

How does Japan have such a big supply of slate?

WALTER784

From: WALTER784

Dec-6

In short response: Nozawa Corporation

The longer reply is:

Nozawa's history and founding story
 
Market capitalization 8.416 billion yen Stock code 5237
 
Nozawa Corporation is a company headquartered in Chuo-ku, Kobe. 1897 Kozaburo Nozawa, the first generation, established Kozaburo Nozawa Shoten in Kobe City and started importing Western indigo and other products. In 1906, we started importing slate boards, and in 1913 we aimed to domestically produce slate boards and established Nippon Asbestos Board Manufacturing Co., Ltd. 1926 Started manufacturing Rokko slate (thick slate), an improved version of Rocco tile. Currently, we are engaged in the manufacture, sale and construction of extruded cement products, slate, non-combustible admixtures, refractory coating materials, and asbestos removal work.
 
August 1897 Established Kozaburo Nozawa Shoten.
March 1906 Started importing foreign asbestos boards.
September 1913 Kozaburo Nozawa, the first president, established Nippon Asbestos Manufacturing Co., Ltd. in Kobe with the intention of domestically producing asbestos. At the same time, construction of a factory started in Motoyama Village, Hyogo Prefecture (currently Konancho, Higashinada Ward, Kobe City). Production started in August of the same year.
August 1937 Construction of Moji Slate Factory in Moji City (currently Moji Ward, Kitakyushu City).
September 1939 Merged with sister company Showa Cement Co., Ltd.
October 1944 Merged with sister company Nozawa Asbestos Mining Co., Ltd., and at the same time changed the trade name to Nozawa Asbestos Kogyo Co., Ltd.
August 1948 Started construction of Tokyo Slate Factory in Morigasaki, Tokyo, and started operation in November of the same year.
April 1949 Changed the trade name to Nozawa Asbestos Cement Co., Ltd.
May 1949 Listed on the First Section of the Osaka Securities Exchange.
May 1953 Construction of slate factory started in Kamata, Tokyo, and operation started in November of the same year. At the same time, the Tokyo Slate Factory was relocated and annexed, and is called the Tokyo Factory.
April 1961 Construction of a slate factory started in Tsurugashima Town, Saitama Prefecture, and operation started in January of the following year. At the same time, the Tokyo factory was relocated and merged and called the Tokyo factory.
June 1964 Started construction of Banshu Slate Factory in Harima Town, Hyogo Prefecture. Operation started in October of the following year.
January 1966 Transferred the cement division to Shiga Kosan Co., Ltd.
August 1966 Redesignated as the Second Section of the Osaka Securities Exchange.
March 1968 Started construction of Takasago Slate Factory in Iho-cho, Takasago City. Operation started in December of the same year.
March 1969 Closed Kobe factory due to new construction of Takasago factory.
October 1969 Established Nozawa Kosan Co., Ltd.
December 1969 Changed the trade name to Nozawa Corporation.
June 1970 Established Jack Aim Japan Co., Ltd. (Changed company name to Nozawa Shoji Co., Ltd.)
September 1970 Started manufacturing ASRock (extruded cement product) at the Tokyo Plant.
June 1977 Converted the Tokyo factory to a factory specializing in ASRock.
January 1985 Started construction of ASRock manufacturing plant at Banshu Plant, and started manufacturing in August of the same year.
August 1989 Started construction of Saitama Factory in Yoshimi Town, Saitama Prefecture. Completed in November 1990 and started operation. Tokyo factory closed.
March 1990 Started construction of a new technology research institute in Fukaya City, Saitama Prefecture. Completed in October 1990.
July 1991 Established SP Nozawa Co., Ltd. (currently Nozawa Trading Co., Ltd.). (Currently a consolidated subsidiary)
December 1994 Discontinued at Moji Factory.
April 1995 The Hokkaido factory was spun off and Furano Sangyo Co., Ltd. was established.
July 1999 Started manufacturing lightweight exterior wall materials (extruded cement products) for houses at the Saitama Factory.
January 2002 Dissolved Furano Sangyo Co., Ltd.
March 2005 Dissolved Nozawa Shoji Co., Ltd.
April 2005 Rokko Slate Co., Ltd. changed its trade name to Nozawa Corporation and became a consolidated subsidiary wholly owned by Nozawa Corporation.
October 2005 Dissolved Nozawa Kosan Co., Ltd.
April 2011 Established Nozawa Trading (Shanghai) Co., Ltd. in Shanghai, China. (Currently a consolidated subsidiary)
May 2011 Established Nozawa Sekisui House Advanced Building Materials (Shenyang) Co., Ltd. in Shenyang City, Liaoning Province, China based on a joint agreement with Sekisui House Co., Ltd. (currently a consolidated subsidiary). April 2012 Completion of manufacturing plant for extruded cement board and start of operation.
July 2013 Listed on the Second Section of the Tokyo Stock Exchange due to the integration of the Tokyo Stock Exchange and the Osaka Securities Exchange.
October 2016 Reverse stock split of 1 share for every 2 shares of common stock. Changed the number of shares constituting one
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  • Edited December 6, 2021 10:28 am  by  WALTER784
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