Opinion Polls: Delphi's Polling Place

Hosted by Showtalk

Opinion polls on all subjects. Opinions? Heck yes, we have opinions - but we're *always* nice about it, even when ours are diametrically opposed to yours. Register your vote today!

  • 4344
    MEMBERS
  • 87906
    MESSAGES
  • 63
    POSTS TODAY

Discussions

How do you best describe yourself to others?   The Real You: Personality Poll

Started Sep-28 by Showtalk; 1389 views.
Showtalk

Poll Question From Showtalk

Sep-28

How do you best describe yourself to others?
  • My career or what I do4  votes
    26%
  • My religious (or lack of ) beliefs1  vote
    6%
  • My political orientation0  votes
    0%
  • My sexual orientation0  votes
    0%
  • My family and/or marital status0  votes
    0%
  • My appearance0  votes
    0%
  • My financial worth0  votes
    0%
  • My social class0  votes
    0%
  • My race or ethnicity0  votes
    0%
  • All of the above0  votes
    0%
  • None of the above9  votes
    60%
  • Other1  vote
    6%
My career or what I do 
My religious (or lack of ) beliefs 
My political orientation 
My sexual orientation 
My family and/or marital status 
My appearance 
My financial worth 
My social class 
My race or ethnicity 
All of the above 
None of the above 
Other 
In reply toRe: msg 1
Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Sep-29

I thought this would get more votes since it’s not political.

Jeri (azpaints)

From: Jeri (azpaints) 

Sep-30

Keeping to my odd man out persona, I only described myself in a work environment "Hi, I'm the xxxx,  can I help you".  In private live I normally said something like "hi, I'm xxx's mom".  My DH works at horse shows and goes by "Shelley's dad" FOFL.  Last show he worked an exhibitor actually asked if he wasn't insulted by people not remembering his name.  He said absolutely not, he was proud that everyone knew, liked and respected his little girl.

me (DENNIS4927)

From: me (DENNIS4927) 

Sep-30

I just say I'm retired
Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Sep-30

That makes sense.  Horse shows are fun.

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Sep-30

Retired is a form of what you do, or don’t do.

Jeri (azpaints)

From: Jeri (azpaints) 

Sep-30

Yes, they are...but dangerous too.  Last weeks show was three ambulances...1 heart attack and two horrible falls!

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Sep-30

Horses caused a heart attack?  How did they fall? I thought by the time someone is at a level to show a horse, they are skilled enough to avoid serious falls.

Jeri (azpaints)

From: Jeri (azpaints) 

Sep-30

No, the heart attack was just a spectator.  Horses can dump very experienced riders.  Remember Christopher Reeves?  He'd been riding for years.  The longer you ride, the higher level of horse you ride, the higher the risk of problems. One of the twin girl actors...Olson sisters?  Shows hunter jumpers, and Bruce Springsteen's daughter made the Olympic team but IIRC fell and almost didn't get to compete?  Not sure that she fell or there was an issue with the horse.   

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Oct-1

I haven't been to a horse derby or horse show, but I used to ride horses regularly when I was younger (age 6 ~ 25). 

Sometimes horses can get spooked by something or another and many people will say the horse threw them, but I'm not so sure about that. Now if a horse bucks somebody off of their back... yes... that's the horses doing. But back when I was riding, it was out in an open pasture with grazed grass (grass was 10" or less high)... and when we would run our horses through those fields, occasionally, they would go from a straight full speed run and just immediately up and make a 45 degree turn of their own accord and occasionally just come to a complete stop from their full speed run.

If they see a hole in the ground like a rabbit or fox hole... they will veer around it because if their foot ever goes into that hole, they could break their leg. Likewise, in open fields, there could be snakes too. Occasionally a horse might see something ahead that looks like a snake but is actually just a dead twig or branch on the ground, but the horse will either stop or go around what ever they see.

So you always had to hold on to the saddle quite tight and have your feet in the stirrups pointing forward when running at full speed to help brace you from flying over the horse's head if he comes to a full stop. But I wouldn't call that throwing a rider. Just the centrifugal force of the rider continuing his forward momentum after the horse stopped on a dime.

But on a horse track or at a horse show... I don't know but perhaps something like a chain, a rope or a long whip might look like a snake and spook them?

FWIW

TOP