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What impact will the SCOTUS decision on Mississippi abortion law have?   The Serious You: How Current Events Affect You

Started Dec-2 by Showtalk; 468 views.
Showtalk

Poll Question From Showtalk

Dec-2

What impact will the SCOTUS decision on Mississippi abortion law have?
  • It will send abortion decisions back to the states3  votes
    33%
  • It will be upheld but it won't touch Roe vs Wade4  votes
    44%
  • It will overturn Roe vs Wade1  vote
    11%
  • It will have no impact at all0  votes
    0%
  • I don't know1  vote
    11%
  • Other0  votes
    0%
It will send abortion decisions back to the states 
It will be upheld but it won't touch Roe vs Wade 
It will overturn Roe vs Wade 
It will have no impact at all 
I don't know 
Other 
In reply toRe: msg 1
Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Dec-2

Abortion is a personal and emotional subject.  I would prefer we not argue pros and cons, just talk about this particular case and possible impacts.

People on both sides don’t believe SCOTUS should decide this. 
 

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/lawmakers-react-to-mississippi-supreme-court-abortion-case/ar-AARomGT

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Dec-3

I personally think it should be left up to the states.

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Dec-3

It falls under state jurisdiction unless SCOTUS decides to over reach.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Dec-3

Showtalk said...

It falls under state jurisdiction unless SCOTUS decides to over reach.

Yes... and here is what is being discussed before SCOTUS right now!

https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2021/12/01/kagan-abortion-part-of-the-fabric-of-womens-existence-in-this-country/

Kagan said that the Court needed to avoid the perception that it was merely a political body (without acknowledging that Roe itself had created that expectation), and argued that not much had changed since Roe and Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey (1992) to change the principles at stake.
 
In response, Stewart said that if nothing, in fact, had changed, that was a point against Roe and Casey, because they “have no basis in the Constitution.”
 
He pointed to Justice John Marshall Harlan’s dissent in Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), a case in which the Court allowed racial segregation, and Harlan had said: “In respect of civil rights, all citizens are equal before the law.”
 
The rights in question, he said, belonged not only to women but also to unborn children, and that the people, not judges, should decide the balance.

Kagan: Abortion 'Part of the Fabric of Women's Existence in This Country' (breitbart.com)

FWIW

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Dec-4

Something for we the people to understand about this issue. The portion in red is of real interest:

America the Outlier

December 2, 2021
 
Kerby Anderson
 
Abortion is in the news because of the Mississippi law being considered by the Supreme Court. It limits elective abortion to 15 weeks. Although critics portray it as extreme, it really isn’t much different from what the current laws in Europe are.
 
Angelina Nguyen explains that America is the outlier. She does a comparative analysis between the Mississippi law and the European abortion laws which also limit abortion to less than 15 weeks gestation. Here are some of the numbers.
 
Of the 50 European countries analyzed in the report, eight do not allow elective abortion at all. They either prohibit abortion altogether or else allow abortion for only specific reasons (such as socioeconomic grounds, fetal abnormalities, rape, or incest).
 
Of the 42 remaining European countries, 39 of them limit abortion to 15 weeks’ gestation or earlier. A majority of those 39 countries set gestational limits for elective abortion at or before 12 weeks’ gestation.
 
Americans often want to follow the pattern in the UK. But they would be surprised to learn the country restricts abortion more than the US. Great Britain still requires a woman to provide some justification to legally obtain an abortion.
 
She predicts that there would be a national uproar if elective abortion was limited merely to the first trimester. Yet the Mississippi law is less restrictive than the abortion policies in 47 of the 50 European countries. The law is mainstream and perhaps even permissive based on European standards.
 
Currently, a woman can obtain an abortion in the US without having to provide a reason, need, or justification. The Supreme Court has allowed some states to limit abortion in the third trimester and for a small number of other reasons. But when compared to Europe, America is the outlier.

America the Outlier - Point of View - Point of View

FWIW

  • Edited December 4, 2021 5:07 am  by  WALTER784
Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Dec-4

That is the heart of the difference between sides.  One only supports the rights of the mothers. I suppose we should call them birthing persons, although in this case they would be in birthing persons. The other side also considers rights of the fathers and the unborn children.  Current abortion laws also include some expectation of privacy for women who don’t want anyone to know they are pregnant and are considering ending it.  It’s really much more complex than either side acknowledges.

Even if SCOTUS rules against abortion, Roe vs Wade will be upheld in most states.  It’s very hard to take away something like this.

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Dec-4

Supporters of the law have only themselves to blame.  They brought it to,public attention by insisting mothers should be able to choose right up until giving birth. Even the strongest supporters would have trouble killing a living, breathing healthy baby or one that is ready to be born.  Only extremists would say that is the mother’s right. It would also be close to impossible to find obstetricians willing to do such a procedure.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Dec-4

But 47 of the 50 EU countries side with Mississippi. And I think that SCOTUS should NOT be involved as there is no Constitutional issue involved.

Therefore, it should be left up to the states as it is clearly not a federal issue. As Row vs Wade so mistakenly made it in '73!

FWIW

 

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Dec-4

Then why did SCOTUS take it up?

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