Opinion Polls: Delphi's Polling Place

Hosted by Showtalk

Opinion polls on all subjects. Opinions? Heck yes, we have opinions - but we're *always* nice about it, even when ours are diametrically opposed to yours. Register your vote today!

  • 4634
    MEMBERS
  • 104597
    MESSAGES
  • 10
    POSTS TODAY

Discussions

What do you think about the Biden’s new puppy and rehoming Major?   The Serious You: How Current Events Affect You

Started 12/21/21 by Showtalk; 6609 views.
Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Jan-3

If your dogs are not loose you don’t have to worry about it.

selzer

From: selzer 

Jan-3

Right, this is why I put up my kennels and fenced them around.  Now I have some kennels in the front that are not fenced around, but so far we've been good.  The one with dogs in it is concrete and six feet.  There is always a possibility that the house burns down or a tree falls onto the kennel and my dogs are suddenly loose.  It hasn't happened since I put up the kennels, not that it cannot.  But if my dogs do land in the shelter, it is unlikely they would be speutered before I could get them back. 

I lost my Arwen about 20 years ago.  I had a crappy cheap chain-link kennel that I made in the back yard and I lost her when she squeezed out on Christmas day.  She was gone for 19 days in -10F weather.  It was the worst time of my life.  I got her back.  Since then, none of my dogs were running loose, when I wasn't right there with them.  

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Jan-4

How did you find Arwen? My dogs escaped a few times but I found them right away.  

selzer

From: selzer 

Jan-6

When I got home Christmas night, I saw that she was gone, and I called my dad and he and my sister and I all went around looking and calling for her.  My dad talked to the Amish fellow and he said he saw her around 3pm down by his house and 6pm down by his folks on the other side of me, but much further down.  It was ten below and we finally went back home.  

My little sister made up fliers with her picture, and I put them everywhere, stores and vet offices in my neighborhood.  I went to the shelter every day, and then every other day when I got back to work.  Never expect them to know what a particular breed looks like.  I would come in and ask if they got in any more shepherds, and they would say no, and I would go and look and there would be 1 or 2 more.   I put an ad in our Newspaper.  I followed every tip, driving down snow covered roads in the bitter cold with my windows open, creeping along, whistling and hollering.  

On January 13, I called in to work because I was physically ill all night again.  I couldn't stop throwing up.  I didn't know if she was dead in a ditch or starving somewhere or caught in a trap.  I was at my mom's when the phone rang.  I answered it and it was someone in the next county thinking they may have found her.  It was about 40 miles away, and I had little hope.  But I got in the car and drove out there.  It was up on Lake Erie in some cabins.  

I pulled up to the address and no one answered.  There were some woods there.  I was just about to get in my car and drive away, when a man in a pickup pulled in and asked if I was looking for the dog.  I said yes.  I was in my early 30s and he seemed to be in his later 50s or sixties.  He said, let's go for a walk, and headed into the woods.  I headed into the woods with him.  I think back on that now, and know I would do it the same, but it is scary all the same.  

I heard her tags, and when I saw her, I couldn't believe it was her.  She was making a high pitched bark I never heard before out of her.  She was barreling at me.  The man said, "there's no doubt in my mind."  It was her.  It was the best day of my life.  They told me she wouldn't let anyone near her, and the dog warden tried twice, but couldn't catch her.  They put a box up under the porch and she was sleeping there for about a week, they were feeding her.  She was skinny.  They gave me the food and I held her all the way home.  She lay her head on my leg and cried all the way home.  

Arwen went up to both the man and the woman and the lady (who was in the cabin) said to her, "if you let us do that a week ago, you'd be home now."  They told me that another lady came to look at her, but said she wasn't her dog, but a lady in Ashtabula County was looking for her dog.  So they called their friends in Ashtabula County where my ad was, and they pulled out their newspaper and found my number.  

I stopped at my parents' house and when my little sister came in, she was lying behind me in the kitchen, so I asked my sister to get me a plate out of the cupboard behind me.  She looked at me like I had two head, but walked over there to get it for me and she saw her.  

A month later, on Valentines Day, I got two dozen carnations and a card and put some money in it and drove it over there with Arwen.  They opened the card and ran out and gave me the money back.  I said, that I put a reward in the paper and never thought of it, and said they had to call long distance and bought her food and everything.   They said the flowers and the card were enough and if you couldn't do something nice for someone, then why are we here.  

In the card, I had said that they gave me my best buddy back.  It was true, and Arwen got her best buddy back too.  There is a song, Mr. Bojangles, that talks about how the dog up and died, and after 20 years he still grieves.  I know that.  I think about Arwen pretty much every day.  It isn't all sad, some of those memories make me smile.  I see her in her progeny, I think about all the stories, all the training, all the kool stuff we did together.  I think about how my parents did not like her name, but she grew into that name and made it, well, everyone that met Arwen loved her.  

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Jan-6

That is a beautiful story with a happy ending.  Do you know how she got so far? Did someone pick her up and then dump her?  You were lucky to find her and get her back.  

selzer

From: selzer 

Jan-7

They say that when lost dogs usually keep going in one direction, or they circle around and stay within a mile or two of home.  My guess is that Arwen was the type of dog that keeps going in one direction.  I figure she headed toward 193 and got blasted by a skunk.  So she went north about 20 miles to the Lake, then she had to choose east or west and chose west, and just kept going, until she found some people willing to feed her.  She hurt her foot, so I am not sure if that helped her decide to stay in one place.  

I was really lucky to get her back.  I think that if I didn't have the brochures, didn't go to the shelter all the time, didn't put the ad in the paper and didn't have a lot of luck besides, I never would have got her back. 

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Jan-7

It all worked in your favor and no one caught her and kept her permanently.

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker) 

Jan-18

I know three rescue groups. Two are good, one is bad.  That is about average.  Liking dogs doesn’t make someone a good rescue group owner.  They have to know what they are doing.

Selzer, Show, me and the dog group on the small forum don’t like the recent push toward only getting rescues.  The ones near us are full of fighting breeds. They push people to take them as pets and then they attack people or dogs.  There are dangerous dogs coming out of shelters.  Rescue groups are supposed to vet their dogs first for temperament and training.  

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784 

Jan-19

DW (GSDogwalker) said...

Rescue groups are supposed to vet their dogs first for temperament and training.  

Don't they have to temporarily (2-3 months) have the dogs live with people trained in rescue rehabilitation that also own a dog just to see how well the rescue gets along with both the people (family members) as well as their dog too.

FWIW

selzer

From: selzer 

Jan-19

No, to be a rescue you don't have to do anything at all.  You charge a "rehoming" fee instead of a purchase price and that is about the difference from being a breeder and selling puppies.  Some rescues are good and foster puppies and match puppies to owners.  Some are breed specific.  Some go out of their way to save dogs on death row. 

Others practice "flipping" dogs.  They go through shelters and snag all the animals that are easily adoptable, for 25-50$, or even no purchase price because they have a 103C charitable -- not for profit.  Well, if you keep track of the bills for keeping dogs, you can easily be not-for-profit and still make money.  

And then there are those that started out for good reasons, but fell into the trap of hoarding.  Pretty soon, they cannot let anyone take any of the dogs because they will not care for them, they become overwhelmed and all the dogs suffer.  

But there are no rules about whom they can rehome to, what they need to require of folks, how much time they need to let the dog settle in and understand temperament and issues.  Nothing.  So it's mostly word of mouth.  Who is a reputable rescue?  And, unfortunately, you might tell someone you got a dog there 3 years ago and they were great, but the husband or son dies, and the lady gets depressed, and things spiral out of control fast, and what was a good operation a few years ago is now a horrific situation.  

I don't know what the answer is.  I don't want more government controls because that is not really the function of government.  We all hear about the horrible places, and maybe they are really a very small minority.  Maybe government run shelters should need to do a home check if they place more than 3 animals in a home in six months or something like that.  Maybe the dog warden, I don't know.  It is so easy to let things get go.  People cannot save them all.  

TOP