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How liberal policies have killed black c   The Serious You: How Current Events Affect You

Started Jul-7 by WALTER784; 314 views.
WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

Jul-7

How liberal policies have killed black communities: Clarence Thomas

By Clarence Thomas
June 22, 2022

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas is alarmed by the decline of families and church attendance in black neighborhoods.
 
Erin Schaff/The New York Times via AP, Pool, File
 
CLARENCE THOMAS
 
In this excerpt from the just-published “Created Equal: Clarence Thomas in His Own Words” by Michael Pack and Mark Paoletta, the Supreme Court justice reflects on changes in his hometown, Savannah, Ga. The book is based on more than 30 hours of interviews Pack conducted with Thomas and his wife, Ginni, for the film of the same name; 95% of the book’s material is new, including this excerpt.
 
Michael Pack: You have talked a little today about how life in the black community has not been improved by many well-intentioned social programs. Do you think, in some sense, it is worse than when you grew up?
 
Clarence Thomas: It’s a disaster. When I grew up, you had family, you didn’t have drugs, you didn’t have gang-banging. You could walk down the street.
 
There was a change in our society. I think that these programs certainly had an impact. Just go back to Savannah and take a look around you. Our worst fears were realized. We didn’t want to be right; we wanted to be wrong. It wasn’t about winning an argument. No, we wanted to lose the argument. We did not want the damage to occur; that’s why we were involved. I don’t particularly like public life; I never wanted to be in public life. I’d like to go to football games. I’d like not to make decisions about other people’s lives, but what drags you into it is when you see these principles being undermined, which leads to such destruction. The policies destroy people, and, ultimately, I think, we’re going to destroy the very thing that allows us to have liberty and to have a free society.
 
MP: So the heirs to those movements, like Black Lives Matter, focus on other things: mass incarceration, police brutality. What do you think of the current movements for racial justice?
 
CT: I don’t really follow the movements du jour. I don’t quite understand them. It’s fascinating to me that the radical groups in the ’60s, that we all were aware of and fond of back then, like the Black Panthers — that’s kind of mainstream now. But we knew they were more marginal back then. I don’t know what to say about this. But if you look at some of the things that still are problematic, like bad education, unsafe neighborhoods, drugs, alcohol, breakdown in families, it seems like these are things that we warned about back then. We were told, basically, take a long walk on the short pier. And I understand that. I understand people not wanting to hear an opposing view. But at the same time, we’re not taking ownership of these policies’ having a significant role in the damage that’s been done.
 
MP: You’ve made many trips back to both Pin Point and Savannah. When you return, do you reflect on your life? Do you reflect on how it is now?
 
CT: I don’t reflect a lot about these sorts of things. A lot of this is depressing, and it didn’t have to happen. The Savannah that I return to is not the Savannah I grew up in. There are good parts, you’re free to move about. You don’t have the segregation, but you’ve got pathologies that we didn’t have before. You’ve got the crime we didn’t have before. You’ve got the disintegration of families that you didn’t have before, disorder you didn’t have before. And they were things that were avoidable. You didn’t have to do that to poor people, and it’s just heartbreaking. Something has changed, so it’s kind of hard to go back.
 
My grandfather would always talk about: How do you help people without turning them into wards of the state, turning them into people who don’t help themselves? He would have this line, “You help people help themselves.” And there was a difference between helping or helping to help themselves. Now we could do it individually because we did it all the time. It was not only our Christian obligation; it was the way we lived. That’s the way our community lived. You have fish and somebody else has beans, they bring you beans, you give them fish, or vice versa. But what happens with people who can’t help themselves? And my grandfather’s line was, “There are people who won’t help themselves and the people who can’t help themselves.” And he wanted to help people who couldn’t help themselves versus those who wouldn’t. And how do you make that distinction? Well, you live there. It’s a part of your community; it’s family, it’s your neighbor. You kn
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PAIndylady

From: PAIndylady

Jul-7

In  all honesty I don't think Clarence Thomas has had his  "ear"  towards the black community in decades.  What -IMO- has changed are opportunities for people of color overall.  I can remember when a young black kid finished high school and could get a job at a ship yard, or a car manufacturing plant or a company like Scott Paper or Coke Cola.   Those jobs don't seem to be available for young black males and females.

With the demise of job opportunities goes the demise of communities.  Neighborhoods where the majority of the residents are working makes for a safer and more robust one.

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Jul-7

That’s because more young black high school grads are going to college and embarking in similar careers to white students. Under Trump more minority people had jobs than at any other time.

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

Jul-7

PAIndylady said...

In  all honesty I don't think Clarence Thomas has had his  "ear"  towards the black community in decades.

I think he explained the situation pretty well. But there is much he didn't mention much about too.

Back when he was a kid, family and community were everything. That's changed in today's landscape. And one more thing between when he was growing up and today's families is that back then, there were 2 parents in the home where as today, so many are single parent homes.

PAIndylady said...

What -IMO- has changed are opportunities for people of color overall.  I can remember when a young black kid finished high school and could get a job at a ship yard, or a car manufacturing plant or a company like Scott Paper or Coke Cola. 

You're clumping "people of color" into a single basket and that just isn't the case. In 1976, when I graduated high school, close to half of my classmates were "people of color", but I only know of two who went to work for blue collar factories like you mentioned. The rest went into sales, marketing, research, doctors, etc. There are many more jobs available today than in 1976.

PAIndylady said...

Those jobs don't seem to be available for young black males and females.

I haven't heard that today except than from the liberal news media.

PAIndylady said...

With the demise of job opportunities goes the demise of communities.

Demise of communities are caused by multiple things... some which Clarence Thomas explained.

PAIndylady said...

Neighborhoods where the majority of the residents are working makes for a safer and more robust one.

Now on that point... yes... I agree. However, most of the project housing created by the Democrats for the poor "people of color" back in the 70's, 80's & 90's became dangerous zones of life from the 80's onward and they continue to get worse even today... more than 45 years later. South side of Chicago is a good example. Police don't even like going into those areas. Nobody works, everybody is on welfare and as welfare isn't enough to live on, many who live in those areas deal in drugs, steal, rob, etc. worsening the communities!!!

FWIW

 

PAIndylady

From: PAIndylady

Jul-8

Well that seems to be the right-wing talking points since 2016.  However, unemployment among people of color is double that of white Americans.  So I guess to make it sound good for Trump, these percentages help with that..but those who are educated know that these talking points don't really compute in real life.

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

Jul-8

PAIndylady said...

Well that seems to be the right-wing talking points since 2016.

Talking points? (* ROFLMAO *) That's what Democrats dish out to their liberal news media.

Republicans come out with policies and carry through with them. Those are not talking points... they're doing and done points.

PAIndylady said...

However, unemployment among people of color is double that of white Americans.  So I guess to make it sound good for Trump, these percentages help with that..but those who are educated know that these talking points don't really compute in real life.

This is a record of achievements archived in the White House logs of Trump's achievements. Note in particular the ones in red which specifically mention "people of color"! Even the other ones where color is not mentioned still benefited many people of color as well!

Before the Coronavirus spread from China across the globe, President Trump helped America build its strongest economy in history. Median household incomes rose to their highest level ever in 2019, while the poverty rate hit an all-time low. Under the Trump Administration, more Americans were employed than ever before—160 million—and the unemployment rate fell to a 50-year low. The unemployment rates for African-Americans, Hispanic-Americans, and Americans without a high-school diploma all hit record lows, while the Trump “Blue-Collar Boom” saw wages grow faster for workers than for managers or supervisors.
 
After COVID-19 forced a temporary economic shutdown, President Trump signed the largest relief package in American history to protect workers and families from economic devastation. Under President Trump’s leadership, the American economy surged back to life within months, seeing record growth and job gains.
 
Before the Coronavirus invaded our shores, we built the world’s most prosperous economy
 
America gained 7 million new jobs—more than three times government experts’ projections
 
Middle-class family income increased nearly $6,000—more than five times the gains during the entire previous administration
 
The unemployment rate reached 3.5 percent, the lowest in a half-century
 
Achieved 40 months in a row with more job openings than job hirings
 
More Americans reported being employed than ever before—nearly 160 million
 
Jobless claims hit a nearly 50-year low
 
The number of people claiming unemployment insurance as a share of the population hit its lowest level on record
 
Incomes rose in every single metro area in the United States for the first time in nearly three decades
 
Delivered a future of greater promise and opportunity for citizens of all backgrounds
 
Unemployment rates for African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans, Native Americans, veterans, individuals with disabilities, and those without a high school diploma all reached record lows
 
Unemployment for women hit its lowest rate in nearly 70 years
 
Nearly 7 million people were lifted off of food stamps
 
Poverty rates for African Americans and Hispanic Americans reached record lows
 
Income inequality fell for two straight years—and by the largest amount in over a decade
 
The bottom 50 percent of American households saw a 40 percent increase in net worth
 
Wages rose fastest for low-income and blue-collar workers—a 16 percent pay increase
 
African American homeownership increased from 41.7 percent to 46.4 percent
 
Brought jobs, factories, and industries back to the USA
 
Created more than 1.2 million manufacturing and construction jobs
 
Put in place policies to bring back supply chains from overseas
 
Small business optimism broke a 35-year-old record in 2018
 
Hit record stock market numbers and record 401ks
 
The DOW closed above 20,000 for the first time in 2017 and topped 30,000 in 2020
 
The S&P 500 and NASDAQ have repeatedly notched record highs
 
Achieved a record-setting economic comeback by rejecting blanket lockdowns
 
An October 2020 Gallup survey found 56 percent of Americans said they were better off now than four years ago, even in the midst of a global pandemic
 
During the third quarter of 2020, the economy grew at a rate of 33.1 percent—the most rapid GDP growth ever recorded
 
Since coronavirus lockdowns ended, the economy has added back over 12 million jobs, more than half the jobs lost
 
Jobs have been recovered 23 times faster than the previous administrati
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  • Edited July 8, 2022 9:48 am  by  WALTER784
PAIndylady

From: PAIndylady

Jul-8

I think he explained the situation pretty well. But there is much he didn't mention much about too.

Back when he was a kid, family and community were everything. That's changed in today's landscape. And one more thing between when he was growing up and today's families is that back then, there were 2 parents in the home where as today, so many are single parent homes.

Divorce rate was also much lower back then.  I'm thinking that two-parent homes even in the white communities is much lower than when Thomas was a kid.  What...he's nearly 75 years old?   Hell, when he was a kid -- Jim Crow was in its hay-day!  Yes...things are totally different.

You're clumping "people of color" into a single basket and that just isn't the case. In 1976, when I graduated high school, close to half of my classmates were "people of color", but I only know of two who went to work for blue collar factories like you mentioned. The rest went into sales, marketing, research, doctors, etc. There are many more jobs available today than in 1976.

I'm  still  with the era of Clarence Thomas when I made that statement about blue color jobs which were plentiful for the unskilled.  I'm betting Thomas graduated from high school in 1965 or there abouts...times were much different than in 1976 when you graduated.  Again...Jim Crow was prominent in many sections of America.  By the time you graduated, civil rights bill had passed, and many companies were looking for -- and hiring -- educated minorities.  Thus those jobs you outlined -- I have a cousin who was in the era of Clarence Thomas, she was recruited by IBM to come work for them in the Philadelphia office...she said that the recruitment was for people of color so the company could look like America.  Just saying.

I haven't heard that today except than from the liberal news media.

Well...I'm not sure why you haven't heard it when blame was aimed at Reagan and Bush having many manufacturing companies and jobs going over seas.  The jobs that I'm writing about went to other countries where labor is much cheaper -- and with that, many low skilled workers were out of luck.  

Demise of communities are caused by multiple things... some which Clarence Thomas explained.

Clarence Thomas is using his 196-s POV. . .and it's not meaningful in today's  society.  And...his striving to  return America back to those days through overturning RVW, or overturning same-sex marriage and -- which I don't understand this potential -- reducing concraceptives (sp)...which helps keep abortions limited.  Thought Republicans/conservatives believe in limited government and low reach by same into the lives of Americans.

Now on that point... yes... I agree. However, most of the project housing created by the Democrats for the poor "people of color" back in the 70's, 80's & 90's became dangerous zones of life from the 80's onward and they continue to get worse even today... more than 45 years later. South side of Chicago is a good example.

Well....I think you're a few decades short...I know some of the public housing in Philadelphia date back to the 40sand 50s.   With the huge migration of southern blacks to the north, housing had to be made to accommodate them.  And -- again, my point is being made when it comes to Chicago...weren't  there auto plants, other manufacturing jobs available then for blacks who moved to the south side of Chi-town?  Yes..and once those jobs went to hell, men -- who were the bread winners then -- turned to other things to support their families -- some of which were extended families due to the continuing migration from the south.

Police don't even like going into tho
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PAIndylady

From: PAIndylady

Jul-8

Talking points? (* ROFLMAO *) That's what Democrats dish out to their liberal news media.

Republicans come out with policies and carry through with them. Those are not talking points... they're doing and done points.

LOL...sorry, but the statistic and so-called facts you supplied are from the Trump White House.  That alone makes these numbers suspect.  Heck...I'm still waiting to see how Mexico was going to pay for the border which didn't get built in four years, two of which had total Republican being, i.e. HOuse, Senate, White House.

Today -- July 8, 2022 - unemployment is at 3.6 percent, and more than 365,000 jobs ere supplied in the month of June.  And with that good news -- black unemployment is  STILL  double that of white Americans...and the same -- but to a lesser degree -- of Spanish-speaking Americans.

Sorry...but after watching and listening to Republicans -- under oath -- stating how corrupt the Trump administration really was, its hard for anyone to believe these statistics you've presented.  However, I will state -- and agree -- that the economy was good (not great) under the Trump administration prior to Covid.  

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Jul-8

Black unemployment rates dropped to 5.5% under Trump which was the lowest numbers in history. Rates jumped drastically in 2020 during Covid lockdowns and election upheaval.  They have not returned to the lower number.

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Jul-8

Today -- July 8, 2022 - unemployment is at 3.6 percent, and more than 365,000 jobs ere supplied in the month of June.  And with that good news -- black unemployment is  STILL  double that of white Americans...and the same -- but to a lesser degree -- of Spanish-speaking Americans

What you are actually saying is that it’s gotten worse under Biden. Everything about our economy was better under Trump,Olivier. You don’t have to like or support him to see that. We are going into a major recession after 2 1/2 years of Biden’s policies.

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