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Would a drug commercial convince you to ask for a medication? SNP   The Healthy You: Health and Fitness Polls

Started Sep-24 by Showtalk; 201 views.
Showtalk

Poll Question From Showtalk

Sep-24

Would a drug commercial convince you to ask for a medication? SNP
  • Yes, if I needed a medication and saw a good commercial for it0  votes
    0%
  • Yes, I might ask my doctor if a medication would work for me1  vote
    14%
  • Maybe, if nothing else worked0  votes
    0%
  • No, I would not rely on ads to determine my medical treatment6  votes
    85%
  • Other0  votes
    0%
Yes, if I needed a medication and saw a good commercial for it 
Yes, I might ask my doctor if a medication would work for me 
Maybe, if nothing else worked 
No, I would not rely on ads to determine my medical treatment 
Other 
In reply toRe: msg 1
Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Sep-24

https://sites.tufts.edu/cmph357/2017/04/09/the-truth-behind-drug-commercials/

The Truth Behind Drug Commercials

…This year I was interested to note that one of the commercials that got people talking was not that clever or exciting at all. It was a pharmaceutical advertisement for a stool softener to help treat a condition called “opiate induced constipation” or OIC. The discussion surrounding the commercial brought light to the ridiculousness of the entire concept.

The pharmaceutical company was marketing a medication to treat a condition caused by overmedication. When you think about it, it’s actually the perfect cycle for the pharmaceutical companies whereby an increase in sales of one medication directly increases the demand of the other with the only losers being us, the consumers.

Now I could take this chance to go down the road of discussion regarding the rise of opiate use in this nation, and that is certainly a very important discussion to be had and a large part of the problem, but let’s focus on the pharmaceutical companies themselves and specifically how they reach out to the public and create demand for their products.

Picture a handsome older couple walking down the beach in front of a beautiful sunset. They’re holding hands as they laugh together. A text overlay comes up advertising some drug for depression or erectile dysfunction followed by the long list of side effects. We all know this commercial or one of the many others like it. Do we ever stop to think why the drug companies advertise to us and should they be allowed to do so?

With the ubiquity of these advertisements, it’s easy to forget how unusual the whole practice is. The US and New Zealand are the only two nations that allow drug companies to advertise prescription drugs directly to consumers. Last year alone the industry spent over $5 billion on television and print advertising campaigns in the US and there’s no sign of it slowing.

What’s the big deal you might ask? The pharmaceutical companies argue that these advertisements create more educated consumers who are aware of the choices available. They help consumers become empowered to take control of their chronic conditions rather than become a victim.

What’s really happening is that drug companies are creating a demand for their product by inundating consumers with advertisements convincing them that they need treatment. Ever since the Food and Drug Administration altered guidelines in 1997 to allow pharmaceutical companies to advertise through broadcasting, many physicians have argued that there has been an increasing movement of patients to seek unnecessary medications. This puts pressure on physicians to prescribe medications to their patients that they feel are not in the patient’s best interests

In reply toRe: msg 2
Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Sep-24

From a medical professional I asked:  Yes, people do ask their doctors to prescribe medications they see advertise on TV. It’s more common when the medications they are taking aren’t working.  Doctors may prescribe them because they want their patients to be happy and well, and they may not know much about the medications other than what they see in product literature and ads themselves.

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784 

Sep-25

Showtalk said...

The pharmaceutical company was marketing a medication to treat a condition caused by overmedication. When you think about it, it’s actually the perfect cycle for the pharmaceutical companies whereby an increase in sales of one medication directly increases the demand of the other with the only losers being us, the consumers.

Japan discovered this about 25 or 30 years ago.

Since then, they've come up with a "Kusuri Techo" or "Medicine Diary". It's a little notebook with about 50 pages in it. They hand it out free to are pharmaceutical companies for those who don't have one. If yours fills up, they'll give you another one.

Each page can hold about 3 ~ 5 prescription labels (depending on how long they are) which includes the medicines prescribed, the date they were prescribed and the expiry date. Anytime they fill out a prescription, they print out a prescription label to put on the packet they hand you with the prescription. They also have a 2nd copy of that prescription that they place in your "Medicine Diary".

If you present the "Medical Diary" when you go to get your medication, they will give you a discount... not sure exactly how much, but it's worth giving them your Diary before you pick up your prescription because it's cheaper.

The pharmacist will go through your diary and confirm whether you are currently on 5 or more medications. If you are, you're flagged in their database as "alert"... "close watch" and the government picks up on that and checks with all the doctors who prescribed those medicines/medications to confirm whether all of them are really necessary. (i.e. government check and balance on pharmaceutical manufacturers).

Some people have certain conditions where more than 5 medicines are required, but they're all checked and confirmed whether they are really required or not and then removed from the "alert/close watch" list until the next medication over 5 is prescribed and then it starts all over again.

Advertisements cost money to make. You need a director, you need the prop staff to set up mics, lighting, camera position, angle, light refracting umbrellas, stage managers, etc. Then they need to air their created commercials on TV. Not sure what the cost of a 15 second ad on TV is in the US, but it ain't cheap. And they run these ads how many times a day?

Ads are for selling something. Marketing people want to entice as many people as possible to buy whatever product they're selling (sun glasses, jeans, other clothing, sun blocking cream, medicine, you name it.)

I would never buy anything by just looking at an ad on TV. The advertisements can be deceptive and may actually harm you depending on the product.

FWIW 

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Sep-25

Our medications are now all computerized so any pharmacy you go to can find out immediately if a new medication will have negative interactive effects.

I don’t care if they advertise anything at all that is legal, but I hate drug ads because to me, they are reasons not to take a medication.  All the negative side effects must be listed. They always show healthy, happy people claiming they have diseases or conditions who appear well presumably because of the drugs.   But any doctor who allows a patient to treat themselves is not a good doctor,

  • Edited September 25, 2022 11:12 am  by  Showtalk
WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784 

Sep-25

Showtalk said...

All the negative side effects must be listed. They always show healthy, happy people claiming they have diseases or conditions who appear well presumably because of the drugs.

Then somebody should hit them with a false advertising or deception lawsuit!

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Sep-25

There is no law against hiring a happy healthy person to appear in a drug commercial.

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784 

Sep-26

I wasn't thinking about the healthy person... 

You mentioned >>>All the negative side effects must be listed.<<<

Did they list them? That was what I was trying to get at.

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Sep-26

They do list all possible major side effects.

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784 

Sep-27

If they list all side effects, then it's just marketing eye candy... as some call it; and there's nothing you can do about that.

FWIW

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