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Education Department - School Board Rela   The Serious You: How Current Events Affect You

Started 10/24/22 by WALTER784; 30361 views.
WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

Nov-10

THE DAILY CHART: PUBLIC SCHOOL REFUSENIKS

POSTED ON NOVEMBER 1, 2023
BY STEVEN HAYWARD IN THE DAILY CHART

According to one estimate I have seen, in 1973 there were only about 13,000 children being homeschooled. Today the number is over 5 million—and may be much higher, as many states do not track the numbers very carefully.
 
The Washington Post has noticed, and you can tell they are worried about it. (The left has always hated homeschooling, and the teachers unions rightly understand what a threat homeschooling is to their gravy train, as most public schools derive their revenue by how many students are enrolled.)
 
Home schooling has become — by a wide margin — America’s fastest-growing form of education, as families from Upper Manhattan to Eastern Kentucky embrace a largely unregulated practice once confined to the ideological fringe, a Washington Post analysis shows.
 
The analysis — based on data The Post collected for thousands of school districts across the country — reveals that a dramatic rise in home schooling at the onset of the pandemic has largely sustained itself through the 2022-23 academic year, defying predictions that most families would return to schools that have dispensed with mask mandates and other covid-19 restrictions. . .
 
Home schooling’s surging popularity crosses every measurable line of politics, geography anddemographics. The number of home-schooled kids has increased 373 percent over the past six years in the small city ofAnderson, S.C.; it also increased 358 percent in a school district in the Bronx.
 
Despite claims that the home-schooling boom is a result of failing public schools, The Post found no correlation between school district quality, as measured by standardized test scores, and home-schooling growth. In fact, high-scoring districts had some of the biggest spikes in home schooling early in the pandemic, though by the fall of 2022 increases were similar regardless of school performance.
 
Yeah, Post—you just keep going with that explanation, as if this doesn’t represent a massive across-the-board No Confidence vote in public schools. Here’s what the numbers look like, and note especially how much home schooling has soared in deep blue states like California and New York:

The Daily Chart: Public School Refuseniks | Power Line (powerlineblog.com)

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Nov-10

Increase in home schooling happens for several reasons. The first is poorly quality education and dumbed down standards.  The second and third are crime on campuses and political ideology.  Children must learn and they must be mentally and physically safe.  Private school numbers would be much higher if they weren’t so expensive.  Private school tuitions reflect the true costs of education.  We don’t realize how much money is poured into public schools because the costs are hidden behind tax revenues.  People are shocked when they find out where all the money goes in the public school system.  

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

Nov-10

If we shut the public school system down and reinvested monies previously going to public schools to private schools, the price of private schools would drop. 

Showtalk said...

We don’t realize how much money is poured into public schools because the costs are hidden behind tax revenues.  People are shocked when they find out where all the money goes in the public school system.  

We the taxpayer need to have the school boards open their books to we the taxpayer (it's our dollars funding them)!!!

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Nov-11

School choice and vouchers.

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

Nov-11

Yep, that would dry up public students and with that, it would also dry up taxpayer dollars to those public schools as they're paid per seat.

Florida and several other states have laws concerning school choice... that should be a freedom in all 50 of our states.

FWIW

 

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Nov-13

They need several things in place for school choice to work. There must be enough money in vouchers to cover tuition.  There must be enough spaces in private schools for every child who wants to attend one.

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

Nov-13

Showtalk said...

They need several things in place for school choice to work.

Offer school choice first... then the saved funds from all of the closing/closed public schools will offset everything else!

Even if prefab classrooms need to be temporarily built until new facilities can be constructed!

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Nov-13

Someone needs to finance and run private schools. It takes time to create them.

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

Nov-13

AI in the Classroom Is Forcing Some Teachers to Reintroduce Pencils

Some schools have attempted to ban the use of AI tools like ChatGPT.

BY MARK GILMAN, THE EPOCH TIMES
October 23, 2023

(The Epoch Times)—Four out of every ten teenagers are likely to use artificial intelligence (AI) to complete their homework instead of handling their own research and accumulating English and grammar skills, even though the majority know it’s probably wrong. According to a study released by the nonprofit Junior Achievement this summer, 60 percent of the 13-17-year-old teens surveyed viewed their use of AI as cheating. In response, teachers, some tech savvy, some not, are either throwing their hands up without a counter-strategy or are requiring their students to turn in essays that are handwritten with a device some of their students have never used in secondary school or college—pencils.
 
“The technology will continue to outpace our ability to monitor it. I require my kids to write all their first drafts by hand. Handwriting is the only way. It leads to deeper learning because it creates more neural activity while you’re doing it,” educational consultant, Washington Examiner columnist, and Catholic high school teacher Pete Laffin told The Epoch Times. “What’s the point if we don’t need our kids to learn what’s in a book and how history happens and so what’s the point of having a teacher? I always say we’ll see, but if it’s anything like the effect that using spell check has had on spelling and ChatGPT being exponentially greater, we’re going to be in a dark place very quickly.”
 
Students have found that typing in a short description of the topic they’re assigned to write about gives them text output in seconds. From developing fictional stories to completing essay assignments, AI tools like ChatGPT can develop quick responses to online queries, drastically cutting down on homework time. These developments have seeped into the classroom much to the chagrin of some school districts now attempting to crack down on the practice.
 
Some schools have attempted to ban the use of AI tools like ChatGPT in the classroom altogether like the New York City Public Schools did earlier this year, because they’re worried their students were using it to cheat. Several school systems nationwide have made similar decisions, including Milwaukee Public Schools.
 
“Blue books and pencils, I’m almost there,” Steven Morgan, an English teacher at Orland High School in California, said to The Epoch Times. “My Juniors just finished reading ‘The Crucible’ and had to write a report on it. Out of 55 juniors, about 20 percent used ChatGPT. I could tell right away. I passed out their graded papers and gave failing grades to the ones that did. They said, ‘you caught me.’”
 
It’s also become a big issue on college campuses, with Stanford University’s student-run newspaper finding that 17 percent admitted to using ChatGPT on assignments and exams in 2022. However, some college professors see positives in students using the new technology in the classroom.
 
“I think students are a lot more innovative with it and not just to cheat. They’re using AI to get past writer’s block and polishing their emails. I do think they have their own kind of moral sense of what’s appropriate,” said Annette Vee, an associate professor of English and director of the Composition Program at the University of Pittsburgh. “Right now, we’re in a bubble of AI. There’s some over-embracing of it that’s going to turn some people off, but there’s going to be a course correction. At this point, a wholesale ban of it is untenable,” she told The Epoch Times.
 
Peter King of AI Product Reviews reported this month an eye-popping 408 percent increase in Google searches by students looking online for AI technology help. By reviewing Google trends, he found that Hawaii and Rhode Island were the top states for these searches nationwide, with Georgia a close second. While lauding students’ creativity, King also wondered about the complex challenges teachers are now dealing with. “AI essay writers offer the allure of an easy and quick way for students to complete their assignments, posing a growing challenge for professors and educators nationwide who are grappling with maintaining academic integrity and effective learning experiences.”
 
One thing that’s certain is that the emergence of AI at all levels of academia is causing educators to come up with collaborative solutions. Tom St. Antoine, professor of Communications at Palm Beach Atlantic University in Florida, told The Epoch Times that his fellow faculty members are now meeting monthly to discuss how AI has impacted their classrooms.
 
“We’re discussing capabilities and sharing sample papers and how to use it [AI] positivel
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Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Nov-13

Are they going to teach cursive again?

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