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What do you think about the Biden’s new puppy and rehoming Major?   The Serious You: How Current Events Affect You

Started 12/21/21 by Showtalk; 6608 views.
Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

12/31/21

Someone might give up a good, trained, stable  German Shpherd to a rescue, but they wouldn’t just dump them in a shelter.  I’m leery of shelter dogs.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

12/31/21

selzer said...

As for a dog biting a guy on your property that kicked at him.  Well, I think that falls into management.  In this sue-happy society, I would never leave an animal in a position where the general public can walk up to it and kick it.  A dog that is tethered is often guarding whatever it is tethered to.  That bite was nothing wrong with the dog at all.  And that is not what we are talking about with the Bidens.  If you were there, if a guy tried to kick your dog, it may or may not have chosen that action.  Either way, I would not fault the dog. 

I didn't fault our dog at all. Our dog was tethered such that there as at least 8' ~ 10' between the end of the tether and our front door. (i.e. He had to walk over to where our dog was tethered for our dog to be able to bite him.) Had he just rang the doorbell and walked away back out to the street, our dog would not have been able to bite him. But he purposefully moved closer to our dog and then kicked at her.

I didn't apologize to him. I just asked him how our dog could have bit him if he didn't walk up to our dog because our dog cannot reach the front door. And that's when he said that he kicked at our dog because he hates dogs. I guess he hates them even more now, but I think he'll think twice before ever attempting to kick a dog again. He moved away a few years later and I've not seen him since... good riddance. 

selzer said...

What was the neighbor thinking to do that to your dog when you were obviously not home?  What a weirdo.  

I have no idea, but as I said above, he moved away a few years later.

At least he didn't report it to the police and that was the last I heard of him. 

FWIW

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

12/31/21

It's all really sad for the owners, the shelters where the pets are kept and even more so for the pets themselves.

Moved from a home that neglected the dog to a shelter that doesn't properly care for the dog and just feeds them until somebody wants to take them home... if they can ever find anybody.

Dogs just basically want love and affection from somebody who they can love back and express their affection to as well.

If only dogs could talk a lot of the problems you mentioned could easily be overcome.

My dog actually talked to me. She had four things she would say to me.

1) I need food or water.

2) I need to go for a walk. She would pee in our yard, but would wait for us to take her for a walk before she pooped.

3) I'm happy you're home... pet me.

And this one took a while to figure out, but...

4) Somebody came up to our house while nobody was at home.

Her barks, whines and body motion spoke volumes to me. Sadly, neither my wife nor our 3 kids could figure that out.

FWIW

selzer

From: selzer 

1/1/22

The thing is, a lot of rescues will not take dogs from owners.  They take them only from shelters.  I would think that trying to have a reputable breed-specific rescue to help find your dog a new home would be more responsible, but a lot of rescues don't take owner turn-ins, and shelters can kill owner turn-ins before you drive out of the parking lot.  

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Jan-2

The GSD rescues here will only take a dog from a shelter or an owner.  They will not take a found dog.  Here’s the shelters call the rescue groups when they get a purebred so they are never available from shelters, only from rescues. Is each state diferent?

selzer

From: selzer 

Jan-2

I think each state is different, or it is up to the states, for publicly-funded shelters.  Like our state revised code requires a dog to be held so many days, I think three, unless it is an owner turn-in, or if they can find a license on the dog it is two weeks.  Since our county does not have a government run shelter, they have to pay to board dogs in the privately run shelter.  

I don't wear collars on my dogs, dangerous.  Some are chipped, some are not.  But a shelter is not required to look for or call you if they find a chip, only the license.  If your dog is chipped and you find the dog, I think you can prove ownership by the chip and get your dog back in most instances, but the shelter does not have to look for or honor the chip.   It's weird.  I think it could be done better.  

Jeri (azpaints)

From: Jeri (azpaints) 

Jan-2

Just a note...we have two American Aussies.  Both are kid loving, friendly take me home with you beauties.  Their ID tags both read "Dogs name, home phone, cellphone and in caps CHIPPED".  The reasoning I used for that was "Chipped" tells an honest finder to take our pup to the nearest vet for ID:  the second was that maybe a not so honest person wouldn't want to risk taking a chipped dog to a vet...so they won't take them.

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Jan-2

Here, the hold period is six days but if shelters think there is no owner they can release a dog after 72 hrs. They can also neuter an intact dog without the owner’s permission.  So you might get your breeding dog back sterilized.  

selzer

From: selzer 

Jan-2

The beauty of living in a poor, rural county, with no government shelters, and only a privately run shelter with very limited funding is that it is unlikely they can speuter my breeding dogs.  But I am doing my best to ensure they are never in that position.  

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Jan-3

If your dogs are not loose you don’t have to worry about it.

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