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Brain fog???   Introductions/Newcomers Nook

Started Jan-28 by nomosmok; 1611 views.
nomosmok

From: nomosmok

Jan-28

Hi everyone

Im assuming this is just from brain fog but was wondering if this has happened to others. In my tender one week smoke free there have been incidences where I apparently hear what someone says wrong or differently & my anger goes from 0-60 in a NY second.  Ive learned early on not to trust myself in these situations, especially at this time, so I make sure I clarify with the person what they said before I walk out the door with a resentment.  100% of the time what I heard was nothing even close to what they said. Now I can blame a bad hearing aid on this but I’ve also done it when reading a text where I totally misread the text. Is this just brain fog?  Have others experienced this? How long does this last?

nomosmok

ex-tobacco user 1/21/20 7:34 pm

Majomar

From: Majomar

Jan-28

Hi, again!

Been there, still am, in a way.

I'm one month tobacco free, and still experience it. Not all the time. It's like... For a few days I'm getting better or my head is clear and I feel as if it were gone, and that part is great (crisis is there but as if my brain can feel how much more I can feel good or great some day, when completely free, it is exhilarating almost) b ut then it hits again, so hard sometimes I just have to lay down in bed until the heaviness and fog clear up. I think it depends on circumstances and that particular moment in life you're at, is it stressful or not etc. I'm really stressed out and that probably doesn't help. So, I don't think it has to last for a long time, don't be discouraged, I think it has to do with your brain recovery, with neurotransmitters that went "all wrong". For me, it feels like this: another layer of accumulated toxins melted and acutely intoxicated my brain, now I have to wait for it to clear up, but then, each time it happens, I'm more free,  and that "layer" that is gone will permanently set free my brain, until detox is complete. I think that detox happens on many different levels, and I take this experience as just another one...

And I don't necessarily hear differently what someone said, it's how I... Emotionally understand it and it can be really completely misunderstood and make my pressure go up in 10 sec and produce a sense of dispair. grin

Exercize helps. 

I'd just embrace it as a recovery sign.

  • Edited January 28, 2020 3:50 pm  by  Majomar
In reply toRe: msg 2
Majomar

From: Majomar

Jan-28

Also, I tend to contemplate about how I react inside myself and how it could be all different and how I can be a better person without nicotine mad how the crisis/situation/bad reaction helps me learn just how to be... better.

  • Edited January 28, 2020 3:53 pm  by  Majomar
nomosmok

From: nomosmok

Jan-29

Thanks Majomar.  

Wonderfully written & pretty much exactly what I’m going through. I really hate to think about all the toxins I’ve put in my brain & neurotransmitters over the years but for me that was one of the “attractions” of smoking- it numbed me out. Now my poor brain has to detox as well as the rest of my body.   Helps me accept the process better. 
I also like how you said it’s how you emotionally hear it that matters. I’m sure that’s exactly what’s going on with me.  This all is a new normal that I need to learn to process differently sans the tobacco to numb me out. 
it’s all an adventure I’ve never really allowed myself to go on & this time I’m going to do it. 
Thanks again for sharing your experience. It really really helps me. 

nomosmok

ex-tobacco user 1/21/20 7:34pm

CindiS319

From: CindiS319

Jan-30

I'm putting my 2 cents in here because I was just checking in and happened to see your post.  I'm hoping you are both still smoke free at this point.  I smoked for over 35 years and am going to be 2 years quit in March and please don't be offended by anything I say.  I'm posting it to try and help you through your journey.  First of all... IT GETS BETTER and EASIER.  But it takes a long time and it is a process (like most of our mentor mods tell us.... so TRUE).  I never thought I'd be a non-smoker or ex-smoker but here I am.  And my husband still smokes....right next to me.  Do I want one?  Sometimes...but not really.  It's a passing thought.  I don't want to be an addict.  I stayed close to this forum and read everything I could that my quit buddies posted for me.  I stopped romancing it and saw it for what it was.  An addiction and a money sucker.  I went through so many obstacles my first year it was crazy.  Every time I had a fight with my husband I wanted a smoke...and there he was smoking because he was upset too... I said to myself "I'm not doing it! I'm stronger than that!"  Now when we get in an argument and he lights up, I just laugh at him.  I seriously have no desire to go back to those beginning days.  You can do this!  Just hang tough and work through the urges and battles.  Use your tools to get through it and you will some out better on the other side.  I really hope my words can give you inspiration and help you through this journey.

  • Edited January 30, 2020 8:03 pm  by  CindiS319
nomosmok

From: nomosmok

Jan-30

Hi Cindi

Thank you so much for sharing your experience. I learn from everyone who shares. It must’ve been a great challenge for you to quit with another smoker in the house. I know it would’ve been very difficult for me.  So kudos to you!  
I’ve been taking things one day at a time & Ive vowed to myself to stick close to the forum, & work any & all tools so I don’t pick up that first puff. One thing that really helps me, which is why it’s important that people like you share your experience, is when I find that what I’m going through mentally & physically is just a normal part of quitting smoking & that it will pass.  Thanks again for caring.

nomosmok

ex-tobacco user 1/21/20 7:34pm

CindiS319

From: CindiS319

Jan-30

Hi again nomosmok,

First I love the pic of your puppy.  I have 2 of my own.  Second, every single thing you are feeling is totally normal and may be different from what others feel in terms of timeframe.  Some may get a brain fog at 2 weeks and some at 5 months.  We are battling an addiction that is personal to each one of us and it is all normal.  There were days that I think I cried for 8 hours a day.  Other days I just screamed at everyone that looked at me ( I apologized later...they understood).  Other days I think I ate 1/2 pound of chocolate.  We have to do whatever we can to make it through the hard times and find some peace.  And I can guarantee you there is peace and freedom along the way.  At first you look at your smoking buddies and are jealous.  Later you look at them and are sad and wish they were where you are because they are taking their health for granted.  It's all part of the process and you can do this!  Number ONE thing... don't smoke.  Not even one!  I've thought about it (like I can have just one), I've had dreams about it... but NO.  Like they say NOPE and they aren't kidding.  I'm going to check back in this weekend on you and so hope you're hanging in there and my words can offer some encouragement and hope to you.

JEM777

From: JEM777

Jan-31

Howdy!

So, dopamine, the main neurotransmitter that smoking manipulates, controls a lot of stuff in our brains and bodies. Inside the brain, dopamine plays important roles in executive functions, motor control, motivation, arousal, reinforcement, and reward, as well as lower-level functions including lactation, sexual gratification, and nausea. After quitting, your body has to get used to its natural levels of dopamine again, and that can bring on brain fog because dopamine is a stimulant. While your brain adjusts back to normal levels, anger, "fog", feeling a step slow, etc. are not uncommon. It will pass. It gets better.

Jem

Smober since 1/31/2019

In reply toRe: msg 8
Jatchat

From: Jatchat

Jan-31

Congratulations Jen one year done and dusted, thanks you for your wise comments

Look forward to hearing from you now that you're in the big house

Kind regards

Anthony 3d

CONGRATULATIONS JEN You Did It! You've reached your 1 Year Milestone! Be very very very proud of your monumental accomplishment. Earning that key meant you devoured that nicotine monster and you don't answer to him anymore. This wicked drug addiction is behind you now but always always watch out for that just one thinking  when stress hits. Year two is a breeze and is when many people try other challenges as well. Keep up the deep breathing, drinking water, and keeping busy as these three simple things can be used for other lifestyle issues. Again, congratulations and you've proven that you are no sissy! relaxed

"Quitting isn't for Sissies!" I quit poisoning myself Sept. 27, 2013

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