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I want to quit not stop smoking   Introductions/Newcomers Nook

Started Jul-11 by Ctina8; 551 views.
Ctina8

From: Ctina8

Jul-11

Hello everyone,

I hope I have posted in the right place. I had stopped smoking for 6 months and have been smoking again for about one month. It would be a lie to say I started again out of the blue as I recognise that I thought about smoking again and then had one puff then you know how it goes. I have been stopping and starting again a few years and its exhausting quitting again each time. It feels easier to quit than the first time but I am increasingly disappointed that I seem to go back to this habit. I am determined to keep educating myself and believe it can be different if I have the support of a community like this one and keep myself accountable to others. These are big asks but for now taking it one moment, one day at a time. 

In reply toRe: msg 1
SusanK1960

From: SusanK1960

Jul-11

Hi Ctina,

Yes, I do know how it goes. It is hard to quit smoking and yet so easy to start again! Something that helped me with this quit, besides this forum, is remembering how awful that feeling of disappointment feels.  It is disappointment in my self for giving in easily.  One of my mantras this quit is “Try Hard ENOUGH!”  I’m glad to hear you keep trying, one day at a time!
 

Ctina8

From: Ctina8

Jul-11

Thanks Susan - its a struggle but not another option - not giving up again I mean...thank you for sharing your mantra - I like it. Will keep trying - thank you for the encouragement.

In reply toRe: msg 3
Loreficent

From: Loreficent

Jul-11

Hey there...

was very glad to read your post. I’m a little over 4 months in, had 2 slips. Been thinking about smoking WAY too much for a couple of days and find that very discouraging. Not planning or wanting to slip again at all, but reading what you wrote about the struggle and going back to it and how it made you feel was helpful and validating that I don’t want to and just need to grit it out for however long. So thank you! Your first day and you already helped someone. See why this place is so good???

Ctina8

From: Ctina8

Jul-11

Thanks for that - it makes a difference having somewhere to go to think it out with others on this journey. Congratulations on 4 months - its inspiring and keep going. You are so right to be in this forum if you are thinking about smoking - I think I slipped up because I didnt take it seriously enough that I was thinking about smoking again - just brushed it off - but in fact I should have used it as a way to strengthen my resolve to not smoke - perhaps then I would not be facing another quit. I plan to pay more attention to the thoughts I have around quitting this time and not get confident that its just a habit, its an addiction and one we dont want to have. 

In reply toRe: msg 1
TinyBadger

From: TinyBadger

Jul-11

Welcome to the forum! I'm glad you're taking this quit with a different mindset than before. It took me a while to figure out that this is an addiction, not a bad habit. I would say that once I honestly took a look at what I was doing and how I was living, I didn't want to smoke. I want something better for myself. It sounds like you are ready for a big change, so I would encourage you to read the articles and post often. Know that people here believe in you will do anything they can to help.

In reply toRe: msg 1
Nope62

From: Nope62

Jul-12

Welcome to the forum! You will find a lot of help here. Help from people who have already been where you are are.

 I have the same problem! I've been told that I am only stopping smoking and not quitting. I actually only have a couple of bad days in the first two or three weeks of any quit. But I always let my nicotine addiction lead me back to square one. I don't know about you, but I lack the commitment to stay quit.

Most people will say that the first days and weeks are the worst for them. For me the worst time is after I've stopped smoking for awhile and the cravings have gotten less intense and further apart, sometimes when I get to the point where I don't have to think much about not smoking at all. I'm staying close to Allen Carr's book this time hoping that will help. I'm getting very tired of quitting also!

I hope you can find the commitment and resolve it takes to QUIT! Good Luck!

Ctina8

From: Ctina8

Jul-12

Thanks TinyBadger - will be reading as much as possible - it makes such a difference. Thanks for the support

In reply toRe: msg 7
Ctina8

From: Ctina8

Jul-12

I think for me the lack of commitment and resolve comes when I start thinking I can quit again whenever I want, like I am in control. That single thought sets me off and I start convincing myself its all under control, until I am smoking a pack a day again, feel pain and sick and the cycle starts again. 

This time I am staying in spaces which understand smoking is an addiction not just a habit I can control. I had a friend say "why cant we just have one cigarrette here and there - its fine" that was all I needed to hear. 

Am going to find the Allen Carr book. Thanks for your message.

Welcome to The Best Rehab Forum For Quitters! 

I'm coming up to being 7 years quit and still pop into this forum to offer thoughts and support. One thing that helped me stay on this wicked tough drug addiction withdrawal was making a pack with myself. I decided to accept all the crap this addiction throws at me. I decided to stay quit and be in control. I protected my quit like I would a tiny baby or a tiny puppy and not let anything or anyone sabotage my quit.

Yes there are many times you are hanging on by your fingernails and this alone tells you how powerful this drug addiction is. I also hated thinking of myself as being a drug addict but it's true - just watch any smoker shakily light up - they are hyperactive and they think the smoke calms them down when in fact it's that nicotine monster wanting to be fed. Once these images got solid in my thick skull, only then I stayed on the course to true freedom. Cigarettes are poisonous! 

It takes our brain over a year to fix all the stuff we screwed up. Those nicotine receptors throughout our bodies will tune out slowly but all it takes is one cigarette to turn up the volume once again. I found the quit so much easier to maintain after 6 months even though there were many times where the pull of the addiction kept trying to seduce me back. It finally all calmed down by 14 months and I'm so thrilled to have hung in there and now I am free for almost 7 years. 

None of us wanted to become hard core drug addicts but it's great to know this forum exists and is the extra support tool to help every smoker develop the quit mindset. The first 3-4 months are our 'change in behavior' and 'changing our mind' period. Then, a few receptors shut down and we feel a little better at staying the course till those smoking thoughts are easier to ignore and persue more worth while things. I wish you the very best of luck in conquering this addiction.

Allen Carr's book The Easy Way to Quit Smoking was by my side throughout the quit. I also watched YouTube videos about how cigarettes are made, and various quit videos. Those cigarette manufacturers actually add extra addictive substances and flavor chemicals to mask the harshness of tobacco which also mess with our brains to keep us hooked. Our mindset is key!

Change your thinking-change your mind by following the quit path long term quitters have journeyed. It helps to read the old posts from successful quitters so you see there is a pattern to the quit. Time, lots of quit time heals our brain and our bodies. So, patience with the process of quitting is necessary. It sucks that it takes so long but just take this one day at a time. 

One Day at a Time - let the days add up - don't fall for it again - tell that nicotine monster that you are in charge! Feel empowered and proud to face this addiction with your inner strength. No more excuses for the 'just one' thinking. You can do this and you must get free so stay in a positive mindset! You are stronger than you think! relaxed

"Quitting isn't for Sissies!! I quit poisoning myself Sept. 27, 2013

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