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Ready To Quit But Scared!   Introductions/Newcomers Nook

Started Sep-28 by justkee; 661 views.
justkee

From: justkee

Sep-28

Does anyone on this forum believe that some people just have a more addictive personality? I have always been a very high anxiety type of person even when I was a young girl! I cannot believe all that I have gone through and I still can't quit! The stress, anxiety, and fear all make me want to smoke. What is wrong with me. I don't even try that hard especially when I am alone and scared.

Anne2020

From: Anne2020

Sep-28

Smoking is your go to - when stressed, angry, happy, sad, afraid, hungry or full.  You need to find something else to replace the go to.  My mom found it impossible to quit.  She smoked all through her cancer.  Right up until she died.  She tried to quite a few times but just couldn't do it.  It was her go to.   If she could have quit, she may have given herself a few more years but, we will never know, now that she is gone.  My dad was the same.  He didn't even try to quit.  He kept smoking right up to his last day because that's what he knew.  It was his go to as well.

It is such a shame.  I miss them both.

I believe some are more prone to addiction than others.   But you can only control you.  If you have an addictive personality, then change your addiction to something other than smoking.  Make something else your go to.  Do you like chocolate?  What would you consider to be your comfort food.  

For me it was skittles for about two months.  Then it was chocolate covered raisins for about 2 -3 months. Then its chips for a couple of months.  Now, at 9 months, I am trying to  eat fresh fruits and vegetables so I can loose some of the weight I put on.  But hey, I quit smoking.

What other go to do you have?  

        

  • Edited September 28, 2020 3:03 pm  by  Anne2020

We are all unique and yes I believe some people do have a harder time sticking with a goal. I had to do a lot of self talk and Stop making excuses to continue smoking.

I tried countless times to quit. But the difference this last time, was that I decided to accept all the crap this drug addiction does to me and nothing and no one is going to sabotage my quit. I protected my quit like I would a tiny baby or a tiny puppy and refused to lose. My family never thought I would ever quit and my sisters gave up trying to convince me to quit. They didn't get it -- as an addict, only other addicts truly understand how agonizing it is to actually stick with staying quit. It is long very slow journey and I like things to move quickly but with this, you must pack your patience and you can't make time pass any faster so just think of today only.

There are times you are hanging on by your fingernails and you'll cry and have temper tantrums because you want that smoke but it's a smoke screen as you just keep wanting more.

An old forum member used to say smoking reminded him of the description of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and over and expecting a different outcome. We are drug addicts and yes some people do have a harder time quitting as they may have more nicotine receptors that stubbornly take longer to shut down.

By about three months quit we have the first nicotine receptors shut down and you'll notice that your blue days lift. These receptors will continue to shut down throughout the entire first year leaving you with about 6% remaining at a year. You'll get smoke dreams where you think you actually smoked which goes to show you our brain rewires as we sleep. So, we still need to be on guard in year two for that 'just one' thinking. I also found I got headaches right around the times when these receptors were shutting down and my blue days became less and less.  All the icky crappy physical symptoms I experienced totally disappeared by 14 months. It finally was over! 

So, keep busy and make a solid promise to yourself that you will end your addiction. You may Want cigarettes BUT you don't Need cigarettes anymore!  No more wishy washy thinking. Be positive and proud to get through the cravings. After all, each time you get through a crave you are starving that nicotine monster that has a never ending appetite for more and more nicotine. I hated the thought of being a drug addict but I was. Ending this insane addiction takes tenacity, stubbornness and a willingness to withstand whatever crap this addiction throws at us. Smile every time to get through a crave and repeat. Ask yourself a question-- Where do you want to be five years down the road -- still a smoker or being free from the chains of addiction. I wish you success!

"Quitting isn't for Sissies!" I quit poisoning myself Sept. 27, 2013

JoelJose

From: JoelJose

Sep-28

Hi Justkee..firstly,you should not fear.The stress you are experiencing is actually caused by the cigarettes itself.Cigarettes actually is not a cure for the stress.You should get past your cravings in a positive manner.Understand the fact that cravings are actually good as it is a sign that nicotine is withdrawn from the body completely.Give it some time and patience.The freedom you are about to receive is priceless.No worries..keep up the good work.

Its my 7th day of quit and i have been smoking since 1 year.i actually enjoy the journey.and i want you too.Never give up on your NOPE pledge.

Kind regards

Joel

justkee

From: justkee

Sep-29

Anne,

So sorry to hear about your parents! I know I have to figure it out and I will. Wish I did not live by myself. I do so much better with someone else around. By myself I panic and smoke. I am going to get some frozen cherries and blueberries because that would also help with the terrible sores chemo causes in your mouth.

You have been very helpful.

justkee

From: justkee

Sep-29

Thanks for your words of wisdom. I know that you are right. In five years I still want to be alive. Beat Cancer Smokefree

justkee

From: justkee

Sep-29

Thank You,

I have been smoking for 45 years. A lot longer than 1. 

So happy you are excited about your journey!

Anne2020

From: Anne2020

Sep-29

I live alone as well.  Do you have a pet?  A kitty or a dog to take up your time and take you out of yourself might be helpful, if you were so inclined.  I wonder if volunteering at the hospital or clinic might help to distract you from yourself.  It is so hard to find the courage and energy to do something new when you are faced with so much but, I find that helping someone who's needs are greater than your own has the bonus of helping yourself.   It must be twice as hard to get into any volunteer programs in this pandemic atmosphere.  Perhaps volunteering at hospitals or maybe pet sanctuaries?  If you do not have a pet, I would highly recommend it for your own sanity.  These days, you can only hug your cat or dog and they can be very affectionate.

Wishing you good days.                  

JoelJose

From: JoelJose

Sep-29

Hi Justkee, how are you? How is it going

justkee

From: justkee

Sep-29

Trying to get my head straight and do this. Going to smoking therapist tomorrow and hopefully smoke my last cigarette. I have to for my life to continue! 

Hope you are doing well!

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