About Smoking Cessation Forum

Hosted by Terry (abquitsmking)

Formerly known as the About.com Smoking Cessation support forum, this community is open to all who are recovering from nicotine addiction.

  • 4706
    MEMBERS
  • 262000
    MESSAGES
  • 30
    POSTS TODAY

Discussions

Back after a relapse    Introductions/Newcomers Nook

Started Jul-15 by andrewuk1983; 1177 views.
Lyney

From: Lyney

Jul-22

Hey Andrew, just wanted to congratulate you on your quit and encourage you to keep going. It's great that you found your way back here, lots of people that have been through what you're going through and can help with advice, reading material, sharing their experience or just being here to listen. Keep up the good work!

andrewuk1983

From: andrewuk1983

Jul-23

Thanks Anthony, it is hard being around smokers and particularly when I know they enjoy it as an indulgence, something I feel like I'm missing out on.  I've recently felt like I'm even forcing myself to smoke so I don't miss out, which doesn't even make sense as I haven't 'enjoyed' smoking for a long time.

I did have another slight relapse but I am trying again.  I always feel a bit ashamed mentioning it on here if I'm struggling but I guess that's what the forum is for really!

In reply toRe: msg 11
andrewuk1983

From: andrewuk1983

Jul-23

Thank you Lyney, your encouragement is much appreciated :)  

slowblumer

From: slowblumer

Jul-23

andrewuk1983 said:
it is hard being around smokers and particularly when I know they enjoy it as an indulgence, something I feel like I'm missing out on. 

I always feel a bit ashamed mentioning it on here if I'm struggling but I guess that's what the forum is for really!

It's exactly what this forum is for because we all struggle when we quit smoking.   That feeling of 'missing out' is so common but it is a lie.  It is our brains crying out for nicotine.  Your friends are not enjoying an indulgence-they are addicted and need to smoke.

andrewuk1983

From: andrewuk1983

Jul-23

Thank you Marge, you are a great inspiration and supporter. 

When I feel strong like I do right now and read back my messages, they seem like rambling nonsense to be honest.  When I'm craving a cigarette, it's truly shocking how many thought processes I go through.  It can literally take over my mind but I know that fades the longer I'm off them.  I'll try to hold onto that next time I'm categorising it as an indulgence!

slowblumer

From: slowblumer

Jul-23

You know, it is almost unbelievable the length our brains will go to call us back to addiction.  Our brain will make us think this stick of poison is desirable and needed for our happiness.  For weeks after I quit smoking  I hardly wanted to even get out of bed in the morning - why? because cigarettes were not waiting for me.

Now 5 yrs later, I often wonder why I thought cigs were so important to my life.  I do not think of them in the morning when I get up and I am so grateful for that.   My daughter still smokes in my back basement but now when I see an ash tray filled with her cig butts I just feel bad for her that she is still addicted.

I have saved over $12,000 and have not smoked 38,000 cigarettes according to my silk quit ap.  Imagine 38,000 cigarettes inhaled into a person's lungs.   I smoked over 40 yrs and since quitting I was able to get my life back.  I began swimming ....our bodies are 'fearfully and wonderfully made'.  It is amazing just how we can heal from a lifetime of smoking.

You can do this.  Those shocking thought processes will indeed fade if we invest the time needed - which is generally one full year to untangle the web of addiction in our lives.  It is worth every minute of the pain.  You  know , now when winter comes I no longer worry if I will have enough cigarettes to get thorough a snow storm.  What a relief!!

Jatchat

From: Jatchat

Jul-24

I finally bit the bullet, bought 14 mg patches this morning and put the 7 mg patches back in the cupboard, boy do the 14 mg patches make a difference. I have not been troubled with annoying cravings, at least they're not as intense, will continue on with these for a month I hope and make a decision about 7 mg later. When I smoked I felt the usual rush, but that was accompanied by guilt, I had let myself down, One of my health goals this year was to give up smoking, and I've made a pretty good fist of it this year, now to continue on. Good luck Andrew You can do it if you set your mind on it, make it a priority, and arm yourself with NRT? maybe, I am giving my lungs a break with NRT, plenty of time to deal with the addiction side of it down the track.

Kind regards

Anthony

andrewuk1983

From: andrewuk1983

Jul-24

That's really amazing Marge, all that money you have saved as well!  I need to try and remember that it's the addiction part of my brain talking when I think I want one.  It's two days now since my last relapse and I'm feeling ok.  Haven't had any real cravings yet, but they usually come on day 4 or 5, so I'll refer back here when that happens. 

Last year I basically had a lump removed from my throat (it was benign) and recently my neck has become inflamed and infected.  Smoking is indirectly contributing to it and I absolutely need to stop.  In a strange way this worrying news is helping my resolve at the moment.

andrewuk1983

From: andrewuk1983

Jul-24

Thanks Anthony.  I actually have some nicotine lozenges stored away - they are the weakest sort (1mg) but as I don't smoke a lot or all the time they are the right strength for me.  In the past, I've tried to tell myself I'm 'above' needing NRT (which is complete rubbish of course!) and then ended up caving in and smoking.  This time, when I get to day 5-ish, if I feel close to smoking like I usually do, I'm going to try a lozenge instead.  Still way better than smoking and if it helps then why not!  

Good luck on the patches too Anthony, I guess you could try the lozenges as well if you feel the need - they are quite good at relieving the immediate craving.  Are you based in the USA?  In the UK, I get the Nicotinell ones from Amazon and they have 1mg, 2mg and 4mg strengths,

slowblumer

From: slowblumer

Jul-24

Andre,

I am sorry to hear about your throat and neck.  It is sad but true that sometimes a physical condition drives us to quit and increases our resolve. 

As I said before, I was a 40 yr smoker and I didn't just magically wake up one day and decide to quit.  I got tired of waking up in the morning coughing and spending half the winter with colds.  My husband died from smoking right before my eyes and finally, I was diagnosed with COPD.  So, you might say I had to have several 'wake up' calls or thumps as they say before I changed my way of looking at smoking.  

The cigarette is killer. 

You can do this. 

TOP