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What Are You Working On Now?   General Discussion

Started 11/19/17 by MarciainMD; 502451 views.
MarciainMD

From: MarciainMD

2/3/20

I made templates and cut out 6 squares of fabric and they are now pinned to the templates.  I am mathematically challenged and don't have a compass so couldn't figure out how to draw a hexie pattern.  I thought I remembered having a magazine that had a large pattern for a hexie quilt and once I found the magazine I discovered that i had actually traced and cut out a bunch of hexies.  They're about 3" so my flowers are going to be quite large.  That's OK with me because it won't take many flowers to make a table runner or even a baby quilt.  I'll let you know my progress.

Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

From: Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

2/3/20

MarciainMD said:

They're about 3" so my flowers are going to be quite large.  That's OK with me because it won't take many flowers to make a table runner or even a baby quilt.  I'll let you know my progress.

You betcha!   

Or even a tote bag!    Whilst on vacation one year, I was using a whole bunch of 1" hexies.  I think I was actually between projects.  I hadn't anticipated this situation so when vacation time came up, I really didn't have a hand project in-progress to take with me.  So, I started prepping and sewing together a bunch of those little hexies.  Essentially, I was "making fabric" by smooshing the hexies together.  

When I had a suitable amount of "made fabric", I made myself a small zip bag.  It was small enough that I even ::gasp::  **hand quilted** it.  I was so impressed with myself. :-)

Here's my little zip bag that I created using the smooshed hexies as "made fabric":

You can see that I simply sewed all the hexies together .. not even in flower units!  You could do the very same thing with your 3" hexies and use them as a tote bag front & back.   Or, if you made flower units, then the tote bag would be even more interesting!

Just treat the sewn together hexies as a piece of fabric .. except that you'd either need to fuse a backing on them or have a lining in your tote bag because you wouldn't want the reverse side of the hexies exposed in the interior of the tote bag ... they'd catch everything!  (and look messy).

Or a baby quilt is another great idea because the 3" size is huge .. and you wouldn't need a whole lot to make up a small quilt.  Because I'm basically a selfish person, I don't know if I would ever gift a hand-stitched baby quilt, unless it was a grandchild.  There is a LOT of work and time that goes into hand-stitching anything.  I like to know that the recipient appreciates that effort .. but that's just me.  You are probably much more generous.  :-)

You also mentioned a table-topper.  I found this idea someplace and save it for future reference.  You wouldn't need very many flower units to make this stunner.   I don't have instructions for it but it seems to me that if you didn't want to fuss with the irregular edges along the perimeter, you could just applique (machine or hand) the ring of flower units onto a square background fabric so that you'd have straight edges to deal with for finishing.   (Even the quilting they did in the center is pretty simple, although it looks very impressive.)

 

I will be looking forward to the reveal of your project!

yes.  honestly I think I might have mentioned it here, but it's been long enough we've all forgotten,.

Suze (casuzenn)

From: Suze (casuzenn)

2/3/20

Pirate (PIRATE_SR) said:

You'd need to fuse them to your fabric before taking them to-go, since it's tough to iron in a car or on a plane.  :-)    If the fusible was *also* water-soluble, that would be a real winner

I got to thinking about this and decided to look for a press on product that is also water soluble so you could just take the product and go without having to worry about ironing it on...and by golly...there is such a beastie..but holey moley ...the price on this stuff is higher than nuts on a giraffe (thank you for that)!!!  58 clams!! https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003T96RYM/####?smid=A8Z92SO0182SM&psc=1 

Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

From: Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

2/3/20

Isn't that just the best description for unreasonably high prices?  :-)   Besides, when I slip that in the normal conversation, I love seeing the look of disbelief (did she REALLY say that?) or comprehension (whoa!) on their faces.    It's the simple things in life that make me happy.  :-)

While thinking about it, it occurred to me that you could use water-soluble glue sticks for non-fusible water-soluble stabilizer products.  In this way, you could take the stabilizer with you, cut it out **as you need it**, swipe some water-soluble glue across the back and ... Bob's your uncle.

I bet the non-fusible water-soluble stuff would be less in price also since the manufacturer didn't need to go through the extra step of putting on the fusible.

Ladder stitch is how I do all my hand-sewn bindings, and any applique.  If I ever get to do any hexies, I'll probably use it for them too.  The stitches are almost invisible.  

Suze (casuzenn)

From: Suze (casuzenn)

2/4/20

Pirate (PIRATE_SR) said:

you could use water-soluble glue sticks for non-fusible water-soluble stabilizer products

brilliant!!!

Suze (casuzenn)

From: Suze (casuzenn)

2/4/20

and you are correct about the cost!!

now I gotta try to find PVA without sticky...hum...that is in the 10-20 buck range on Amazon...much better

and then I found this....

https://www.joann.com/bosal-stick-stitch-n-rinse-wash-away-stabilizer-10%2Fpkg-8.5x11/16842957.html

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