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Sashing quilt motif - leaves on a stem, continuous line   General Discussion

Started Nov-29 by Pirate (PIRATE_SR); 250 views.
Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

From: Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

Nov-29

I've been spending some of my time getting used to my new Innova longarm quilting machine.  I first loaded up a doodle cloth but quickly became bored with that because I couldn't think of what to quilt.  Then I remembered that, during the upheaval of emptying the family room (where the longarm lives)  of everything (prior to having the floors redone), I rediscovered a set of 3 "Skill Builder" quilting practice panels.  The panels are small: 36"x45"   Each panel is printed with a "pieced" design and then printed with all sorts of quilting motifs.  Sometimes directional arrows are printed on the design, sometimes you need to figure out the quilting path yourself.  There are continuous line designs, as well as stand-alone designs.

One sashing/border design that I just finished stitching is one that I realized that I really like.  It's easy, it's simple ... IT LOOKS GREAT!  And I'm gonna share it with y'all.

Here is the final result.   It may LOOK as though you do the stem first, but you DO NOT.  The stem is created AS YOU QUILT, which means  that if you had a *curved* area,  you  could totally stitch this design to fit the space you have, straight or curved!   That mis-shapen leaf at the end (on the far right)?  Heh .. that's my freehand leaf to finish off the space.   When you're doing all the leaves yourself, they become consistent with each other.  (I also discovered, with these pre-printed design lines, that I am absolutely dismal at staying on the lines!  I'm hoping that the printed lines wash out.  :-)  )



To start .... you'll begin at the left hand edge of the space to be quilted (if you are right handed).   I found it easiest to draw line on the right side of the leaf first,  THEN draw the left side line back to the stem.  The stitching seemed to flow easier that way.  I started with the leaf below the stem.  You don't have to; you could absolutely start with the first leaf on top of the stem.  The reason I started with the leaf below the stem is because that's the way the design was printed.  :-)

Next step: draw the leaf on top of the stem.  You are *always* going to alternate leaves ... bottom/top... bottom/top ...   from the base of the leaf you just drew, draw a little bit of the stem then begin to draw the right-hand line of the next leaf, up to the point, then back down on the left-hand side of the leaf to the stem:

Next step ... exactly the same as the previous step!  i.e.:  from the base of the leaf you just drew, draw a little bit of the stem then begin to draw the right-hand line of the next leaf, up to the point, then back down on the left-hand side of the leaf to the stem:

You can now see how the stem is created *as you stitch*.  The leaves are stitched, alternating sides of the stem.  

These leaves happened to be a smooth, double-pointed leaf, but if you wanted to stitch a curvy leaf, you absolutely could.  Or any other shape you thought of.


If you wanted to draw (in chalk, perhaps) a straight line as a guide for the stem, that would be a good aid.  Then all you'd need to be concerned about is the shape of those doggone leaves!   But, wait!  Nature doesn't make all leaves exactly the same!  So you shouldn't be overly concerned about it either!   So *what* if your leaves aren't precisely, 100%, exactly the same???  You are not a computer!  You are doing free hand quilting! 

anyway, I thought I would share this with y'all and maybe you'd like to draw it first on a white board or scratch paper to get the muscle memory down and then practice the quilting.  :-)

MarciainMD

From: MarciainMD

Nov-29

Thanks so much for this tutorial!  I want to draw it out to keep so I can start practicing after I get my sewing room put back together after DD and DSIL's visit.  If I don't draw it out I will never remember how to do it and would probably not be able to find this thread again.unamused

Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

From: Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

Nov-29

Oh .. I forgot to add ... this is simply the way that *I* figured out to do it.  If y'all find a different path that better suits your stitching style, then by all means, stitch it that way.  The end game is to have a good looking quilting motif.  How you get there is personal.  :-)

LABFIEND

From: LABFIEND

Nov-29

Is this going to go on your blog so we can try it later???  Hint hint!!

Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

From: Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

Nov-29

hint duly noted. :-)

Shelley figuring out the sewing path and getting it to flow us awesome. Thanks for the tutorial that is a nice design.

Judy (DJZMOM)

From: Judy (DJZMOM)

Nov-30

That IS cool.  Thanks!  I'm printing this page to save.

Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

From: Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

Nov-30

Pssst!   Check your email! :-)

Judy (DJZMOM)

From: Judy (DJZMOM)

Nov-30

Oops!  I was behind today.  :-)

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