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What Are You Working On Now?   General Discussion

Started 11/19/17 by MarciainMD; 539098 views.
Cathy (cacnurse1)

From: Cathy (cacnurse1)

Aug-14

I like the first one best.  Glad I could contribute. I have more if you need them.relaxed  Blue is my favorite color so not surprised there were a lot of them.  After seeing you color controlled squares and Judy in Ohio's red with lights, I may spend some time sorting my strips by color to make the time pass after my shoulder replacement next Tuesday.

Cathy (cacnurse1)

From: Cathy (cacnurse1)

Aug-14

Mishii said:

People have asked me how I like my new machine

I missed or forgot something.  What machine did you get?  I tried to interest Bob in playing with my long arm but had no success.unamused

Mishii

From: Mishii

Aug-14

I went with an APQS Lucey.  With a 14 foot table in case I decide to start quilting circus tents.

He has not embraced the quilting fun. He is now referring to himself as my bobbin bitch. He said today the only reason I’ve gotten him involved is because I get bored watching it stitch. He’s not wrong, but the computer was HIS idea. I knew I wouldn’t use it. The only extra I wanted was some zippers!

Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

From: Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

Aug-15

With computerized quilting,  can you honestly say that *you* did the quilting?  As in on the label, "quilted by ...... machine?" ????

I can certainly see computerized quilting for a business offering edge to edge or pants.... that would be your bread and butter.  I can even see using a computer design for a complicated block.  I remember one Big Name designer/teacher saying that she used her computer system for stitching perfect circles which she would then use as a base for free-form stuff.

But I think it would be somewhat disingenuous to say you quilted it when the computer did the whole thing.

Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

From: Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

Aug-15

Sometimes I see a picture shared by someone and it intrigues me.  Sometimes there is a pattern and sometimes not.  A lot of the times, I take it as a personal challenge to deconstruct the project to see how it is made (and then I don't need to buy the pattern :-)   ).

I belong to a Facebook group, "Applique Quilting".  A member, Sallieann Harrison, recently shared this zippered pouch project of hers, which interestingly enough, did not have any applique on it.  :-)   I suspect that she simply was sharing it to the various craft groups she belonged to.   She didn't give any measurements nor did she give a pattern *but* she did say that if anyone was interested, to private message her ..... to which I assumed she *has* a pattern available but it is against the group rules to sell anything on the group.

Now, I absolutely ADORE making zip pouches!  I have lots of patterns, tutorials and deconstructions.  So, when I saw Sallieann's zip pouch, I felt compelled to deconstruct it.  Bear in mind, there were *no* measurements given nor was there anything in the original photo for size comparison.  Therefore, I just kinda made my own measurements.

Here is Sallieann's photo of the zip pouch she shared.  She didn't give a name to it, so I am calling it a "Contrast Flap" zip pouch.  How original.  :-)   See how there are "segments" across the face of the pouch?  Each segment has a "flap" on top of it, which has been pulled to the side to reveal a contrast lining.  The contrast flap is not as wide as the underlying segment piece.   It took me a bit to realize that when the contrast flap was pulled to the side, it was anchored at the bottom on the **adjacent** segment.
 

Here is my first attempt .... you will note that I kept the number of contrast flaps (7) as on the original, I wasn't paying attention to how WIDE the pouch should have been.  You can see that  when I boxed the corners of the pouch, the end flaps got caught up in the boxing, which is not happening on the original and I don't think looks very attractive, although it doesn't hinder the functionality of the pouch.

My go-to zip pouch tutorial is for the Open-Wide Pouch , which I think I may have shared before.  I really like this pouch design because the entire width of the pouch opens up since you use a zipper longer than the pouch is wide.  Not only does this give you access to the entire width of the pouch but it completely eliminates the sometimes very tricky construction technique of making the ends of the zipper look tidy.

What I was doing (with Sallieann's pouch as the guide) was to simply construct the FRONT of the pouch and then use the Open Wide tutorial to make the actual pouch.  This particular pouch uses a 9"x12" shape (cut size) and finishes at approximately 7" high by 8" long by 3" deep.   The segments in my pouch are about 2" wide and the contrast flaps are about 1.75" wide.

Once the contrast flap piece was made, I put on a top and bottom band to size it up to the 9"x12" size required by the Open Wide tutorial for this size pouch.


I'm thinking that Sallieann's pouch either must have been bigger than my dimensions OR her segments + contrast flaps could have been significantly narrower.   

So, for my next attempt, I decided that I wanted to keep the finished size of my Open Wide pouch (it's a good all-purpose size) so that I decreased the number of contrast flap segments to 5.  I also kept in mind that in order for the flap segments to NOT get caught up in the boxing, I needed to have "plain" segments on each end to accommodate the boxing.

The top & bottom bands were kept the same as in my test piece.  Note: when I looked at the finished version of my next attempt, I was thinking that the top band is a bit too deep and the bottom band isn't deep enough.  If I make another version, I will decrease the depth of the top band and increase the depth of the bottom.

I also got fancy with the zipper pulls on this one!   I have a purchased bling charm, along with the 2 homemade tassels made from embroidery floss.   You will note that the contrast flaps on THIS version are not part of the boxing.  I think this looks a whole lot better.

And here is the view of the interior:

And that's what I have been fiddling around with lately.  :-)

Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

From: Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

Aug-15

but WAIT!  There's more!  LOL!

When I had been rummaging through my fabric scraps, i came across a very intriguing piece of a cat motif fabric that seemed to be of a suede-like texture .. kinda like upholstery fabric.  It was just a very small piece but more than enough to make a Open Wide pouch.  I asked my girls if any of them would be interested in a pouch made from this fabric and my middle daughter, Lisa, raised her hand.

Below is the Open Wide pouch I made with this fabric.  The contrast band is an option offered by the tutorial.  The fabric I used for the contrast band is a drop-dead gorgeous piece of coppery- taffeta that is intentionally "textured".   

Years ago, when Lisa was participating in vintage and re-enactment dances, I made a 1940s style dress for her with that coppery taffeta.  I had made this particular dress because my mother had a very similar looking dress which had a beautiful taffeta petticoat to wear underneath.  I don't know what happened to the dress, but I still have the petticoat .... so I made a dress for Lisa to wear and use the petticoat.  :-)   I'm sure when Lisa sees this zip pouch, she will immediately remember that dress.  :-)

You can't tell the suede texture from the photo, but it is there.  The tassel is a commercial one that I bought.


And here is the interior:

And in case anyone is interested in the swing dress I made for Lisa, here's a picture of her twirling in it!


and THIS is my Mom's petticoat that Lisa is wearing under the dress.

LABFIEND

From: LABFIEND

Aug-15

Mishii said:

“Hey, that one I did today was great. It was square and flat and no open seams. See? You can do good stuff!”  I went and looked at the quilt and had to tell him….yeah, that was Ellen’s. 

ROTFL!!!!  Husbands, go figure!

Mishii

From: Mishii

Aug-15

A discussion to be had for sure. I think it ranks up there with hand vs machine quilting. Who is the real quilter?

In my case, it doesn’t really matter since I’m not entering shows or showing my work to anyone.  I can see it being a source of contention in the show circuit. 

Is there a difference between this and using an embroidery machine? Or the machine used to cut out the appliqué?  Or heck, rulers, rotary cutters, and templates or even the paper pantographs?

At what point do the tools we use to improve our work make it not our work? (I’ve been watching #### and the City lol)

We did discover there is a pretty significant learning curve and a whole other skill set. Quite frankly I can stitch an edge to edge in probably 1/3 of the time it takes the computer to do it. I wouldn’t have been able to use the drama mask pattern though so there is that. 

Perhaps there are people that can go sew while it is quilting, but that hasn’t been our experience. It works perfectly while you watch it. Walk away and you instantly run out of bobbin or your thread breaks or something pleats. 

I think I will wind up using it for the things I’m not capable of doing - like the drama masks. I would have completed the quilt and it would have been fine. This just makes it extra. It was a tshirt quilt using tshirts from her years in a local theater. 

Had I known then what I know now, would I have still purchased it? Hmm, dunno. Without it, Pita wouldn’t have gotten involved and I would still have a stack of tops instead of a stack of quilts. But since I prefer quilting over piecing, is that a good thing?  On the other hand, I don’t retire for another 12 years. Would I have really discovered the worm hole that gave me more hours in the day?

Things to ponder. 

Love your bags. I really like those flaps. Those were a big thing years ago, I remember seeing those used along in art quilts, I think in the 90's.

Ya know if I could I would jump at getting the computer. There are so many things it could do in combination with free motion. I also like some of the amazing all over designs. 

I have seen some amazing artistic things done with computer machines and it is all about putting it all together. 

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