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new topic - shouldn't the photos of samples in quilt patterns be good workmanshi   General Discussion

Started Feb-8 by Dee in TX (DBRADFOR3); 461 views.

I know I am OCD about my sewing, but I've noticed several quilt samples/patterns lately that really don't sell the pattern very well because the workmanship is horrible.  It's kind of like sending in a resume with typos - why would I want to purchase your pattern when your sample isn't put together well.  The one below popped up here in an ad and I thought oh, what pretty colors but good golly.  Some of those points are terrible!  I know she's selling the pattern and not the quilt, but I would think your sample should be at least decent quality and not obviously thrown together.   Makes me wonder how good her pattern instructions will be (this particular one is a pattern for sale on etsy).  And I know Storm at Sea is a difficult pattern.  But the reason it works is because of those points matching appropriately.  sigh.  I'm feeling grumpy. japanese_ogre

Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

From: Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

Feb-8

wow ... those ARE kinda glaring, aren't they?

judyinohio

From: judyinohio

Feb-8

Anyone can try to sell anything on Etsy.  It's a perfect case of "Buyer Beware".

Midkid5

From: Midkid5

Feb-8

I get what you are saying, the other day I was going to watch a YouTube on scrap quilts, by a well known teacher.  She says something about not making an ugly scrap quilt than proceeds to pull out a jelly roll. She didn't have time to organize her scraps for the video.  Needless to say I chose not to watch, jelly roll and scraps are two different things to me.

Jo

CC (ccase5)

From: CC (ccase5)

Feb-9

I too have noticed bad piecing in magazines. wondered why but think it is just laziness on someone's part. well, quilter and whom ever picks the photos.

I can understand it for a shop sample perhaps, trying to get it done quickly.  But for a publication I would think you'd want it to be the best possible.  But now "publication" doesn't have the same meaning as it used to, just think of all the spelling and grammatical errors you see everywhere now.

judyinohio

From: judyinohio

Feb-9

Or the sloppiness I am seeing in food magazines really turns me off.

Young writers rely on voice dictation and sometimes get comical results which they could easily correct if they would proofread their own work.  Here's a good example from a Hidden Valley Ranch recipe in a recent Taste of Home magazine:

"Place a lightly beaten eggs in a small bowl. (Yeah, the word eggs was written as plural in the recipe, I did not make an error.) Dip each breast into the egg, shaking off any access, then dip into the dressing mixture ..... "

It is possible that the recipe writer does not know the difference between access and excess in which case the person should go back to college and take English 101.

The magazine needs to hire an editor to review their recipes before publication.

CC (ccase5)

From: CC (ccase5)

Feb-9

and patterns galore that need to have corrections put out too late for some of us! living the fast track I guess. too fast.
tuckyquilter

From: tuckyquilter

Feb-21

I agree.  I am amazed that some of the most popular quilting magazines "Free Pattern" is older than dirt.  If a company wants new business, they might want to update their advertising.  Why would I want to subscribe to a magazine that is old and outdated in nature.  

Of course that said, there really isn't much new in the quilting world these days in general.  Everything just cycles around and around.  I think I've been through at least 4-5 Hexie phases, and applique rears it's ugly head every so many years too.  LOL  

IF you want to make STORM AT SEA, use Jodi Barrows method.  

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